Teaching Multicultured Students: Culturism and Anti-Culturism in School Classrooms

By Alex Moore | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

People too numerous to mention have helped in the production of this book, in all kinds of ways. Particular thanks, however, must go to Peter Woods, Jane Miller, Josie Levine, Keith Kimberley and Alex McLeod for helping me, at various points, to develop and organize the central ideas; to the staff at the case-study schools for allowing me into their working lives as a critical friend and for responding so constructively to my analyses of their practice; to the students at those schools, whose voices continue to shine through with such vividness and candour; to my family and friends—and in particular my wife Anna—for keeping me at it and restoring my often flagging confidence; to Roger Slee and Falmer for seeing the potential for a book in the first place—and for making me believe that I could write it; to Mike Quintrell at King’s College and Andy Hudson at the Institute of Education for their endorsements and encouragement; and to all those colleagues at Goldsmiths College who, in their different ways, helped me to find the time, the energy and the faith to complete the project—in particular, Susan Sidgwick, Clyde Chitty, David Halpin, Nola Turner, Dennis Atkinson, Gwyn Edwards, Paul Dash and Shirley Chapman.

Alex Moore
July 1999

-ix-

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Teaching Multicultured Students: Culturism and Anti-Culturism in School Classrooms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • 1 - Themes and Perspectives 1
  • 2 - Marginalizing Bilingual Students 16
  • 3 - Bilingual Education Theory 43
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - Symbolic Exclusion 62
  • 5 - Partial Inclusion 82
  • 6 - Partial Inclusion 101
  • 7 - Working with Bidialectal Students 126
  • 8 - Exercises in Illumination 153
  • 9 - Afterword 175
  • References 186
  • Index 196
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