Teaching Multicultured Students: Culturism and Anti-Culturism in School Classrooms

By Alex Moore | Go to book overview

3

Bilingual Education Theory

In Support of Inclusion

Principles of Good Practice
I have already indicated that this is not a book ‘about’ bilingualism. However, because the bulk of the book looks at cultural issues through examining the experiences of young learners who are bilingual, because it is necessary to provide some theoretical context to support our understanding of these experiences, and because the bulk of current theory and research works oppositionally to much classroom practice—including the physical and symbolic withdrawal of students and the missionary approach to teaching—it is necessary to provide some brief background, and in particular to outline the principal arguments, drawn from research, that have informed my own presentations and analyses of classroom events. Having summarized these arguments as a way of simultaneously suggesting some basic principles of effective classroom practice, I will consider in a little more detail the possibilities of three particular strands of bilingual education theory for promoting greater physical-symbolic inclusion in the school classroom. These three strands are:
• notions of language-in-context
• distinctions between ‘everyday’ and ‘academic’ language
• the ‘transferability’ of language skills
The following, then, are the central research arguments to which this book subscribes:
1 There is an impressive—one might say irresistible—body of research evidence to show that bilingualism has the capacity to be linguistically and cognitively advantageous (and therefore should be linguistically and cognitively advantageous), provided it is allowed to be so by monolingual-dominated schools. (This research has included several longitudinal studies, including those by Malherbe 1946, Phillips 1972, San Diego City Schools 1975, Carey and Cummins 1983.) While it is true that not all theory and research has pointed to academic advantages for bilingual

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Teaching Multicultured Students: Culturism and Anti-Culturism in School Classrooms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • 1 - Themes and Perspectives 1
  • 2 - Marginalizing Bilingual Students 16
  • 3 - Bilingual Education Theory 43
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - Symbolic Exclusion 62
  • 5 - Partial Inclusion 82
  • 6 - Partial Inclusion 101
  • 7 - Working with Bidialectal Students 126
  • 8 - Exercises in Illumination 153
  • 9 - Afterword 175
  • References 186
  • Index 196
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