Teaching Multicultured Students: Culturism and Anti-Culturism in School Classrooms

By Alex Moore | Go to book overview

5

Partial Inclusion

Pedagogy and the Notion of ‘Cultural Visibility’

This is an ethnocentrism which transforms a division of classes into the negation that there can rightfully exist other tastes. One class affirms itself by denying to another its right to participate in the culture, declaring openly that another aesthetic or set of sensibilities has absolutely no value. Once the legitimate culture has affirmed distinction, it rejects, above all, any aesthetic that does not know how to distinguish the forms and current styles of art, especially the inability to distinguish art from real life.

(Martin-Barbero 1993, p.81, referring to the notion of ethnocentrism and class in Bourdieu 1968)

Multiculturalism is generally about Otherness, but it is written in ways in which the dominating aspects of white culture are not called into question… the norm of whiteness [becomes] an ethnic category that secures its dominance by appearing to be invisible.

(Giroux 1992, p.117)


School A: The Inclusive Policy for Bilingual Students

The first case study in this section is drawn from data gathered at School A, referred to already in Chapters 2 and 3. The organizational issue at this school—where over 50 per cent of students were bilingual and over 50 different first languages were spoken—was well on the way to being settled in favour of a move away from withdrawal towards full mainstream support. It would, however, take the better part of two more years for this settlement to become part of the generally unquestioned culture of the school, and it was a development that still raised objections from many staff.

The shift of culture had enabled the school to debate much more fully than before pedagogical and theoretical issues to do with bilingualism, and to alter its practice accordingly under the joint leadership of a progressive, strongly anti-racist headteacher, a committed and very knowledgeable head of EAL, and a senior teacher given responsibility for overseeing developments in provision for multicultured students across the school curriculum. There was a growing acceptance at the school that students’ bilingualism ought to

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Teaching Multicultured Students: Culturism and Anti-Culturism in School Classrooms
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Series Editor’s Preface xi
  • 1 - Themes and Perspectives 1
  • 2 - Marginalizing Bilingual Students 16
  • 3 - Bilingual Education Theory 43
  • Notes 59
  • 4 - Symbolic Exclusion 62
  • 5 - Partial Inclusion 82
  • 6 - Partial Inclusion 101
  • 7 - Working with Bidialectal Students 126
  • 8 - Exercises in Illumination 153
  • 9 - Afterword 175
  • References 186
  • Index 196
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