The Seduction of the Mediterranean: Writing, Art, and Homosexual Fantasy

By Robert Aldrich | Go to book overview

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL ESSAY

Many of the works of most of the writers mentioned in this study—and almost all of the works of a few of them—contain homoerotic references to the classical or modern Mediterranean. It therefore seems unnecessary to catalogue the complete list of such ‘primary’ works. A number of authors mentioned in this book, however, remain untranslated into English, and much writing is difficult to locate in any language in libraries or collections. This is particularly true for the works of some of the lesser authors, as well as the early homosexual magazines. The Arno press has published several relevant collections of historical documents on homosexuality—such as Documents of the Homosexual Rights Movement in Germany, 1836-1929 (New York, 1975) and A Homosexual Emancipation Miscellany, c. 1835-1952 (New York, 1975)—but much more reissuing (and translating) of rare works could be done. There are now a number of collections of ‘gay’ literature which include excerpts from prose works or poems. One of the most comprehensive selections of poetry is Stephen Coote (ed.), The Penguin Book of Homosexual Verse (London, 1986), but Brian Reade (ed.), Sexual Heretics: Male Homosexuality in English Literature from 1850 to 1900 (New York, 1970), remains valuable both for its selection of texts and for the editor’s introduction.

Among secondary sources, Wayne Dynes (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Homosexuality (New York, two volumes, 1990), is an excellent starting-point; it contains articles on almost every individual mentioned in this study and a number of thematic issues as well. The articles also include short bibliographies. Several other works are particularly interesting for studies of the types of homosexual writing discussed here. Wolfgang Popp, Männerliebe: Homosexualität und Literatur (Stuttgart, 1992), is an important and fine study of different themes in homosexual literature. James W. Jones, ‘We of the Third Sex’: Literary Representation of Homosexuality in Wilhelmine Germany (New York, 1990), is a superb analysis of German fictional and non-fictional literature from the late nineteenth century to the First World War. Louis Crompton, Byron and Greek Love: Homophobia in 19th-century England (Berkeley, 1985), presents an authoritative study of

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The Seduction of the Mediterranean: Writing, Art, and Homosexual Fantasy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations viii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Sex and Society in the European Mediterranean 13
  • 2 - Winckelmann and Platen 41
  • 3 - Englishmen in Southern Europe 69
  • 4 - Following in the Footsteps 101
  • 5 - Mediterranean Men in Art and Photography 136
  • 6 - The Social and Historical Context 162
  • 7 - Contemporary Echoes 186
  • Conclusion 217
  • Bibliographical Essay 225
  • Notes 229
  • Index 256
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