Greek Rational Medicine: Philosophy and Medicine from Alcmaeon to the Alexandrians

By James Longrigg | Go to book overview

Appendix

The role of the opposites in pre-Aristotelian physics

An appraisal of the role of the four opposites, hot, cold, moist and dry in Milesian physics is difficult since direct evidence of Milesian thought is extremely meagre and we are almost exclusively dependent upon secondary sources. While it is true that these sources do ascribe to these four opposites an important role in Anaximander’s cosmology 1 and this evidence has been widely accepted at face value, 2 the accuracy of the evidence of Aristotle and Theophrastus and the doxographical sources dependent upon them has been challenged. 3 Whether or not one is prepared to accept this challenge in its entirety, 4 the claim that Aristotle’s attempt to show that his predecessors held these opposites to be principles was motivated by his desire to find in pre-Socratic thought presentiments of his own theory of Form and Privation 5 is most persuasive. 6

Notwithstanding these misgivings, some scholars are still prepared to accept as reliable Peripatetic evidence concerning the role of these opposites in Milesian cosmology. 7 Others, however, firmly reject this evidence. 8 There is, then, a fundamental dichotomy in scholarly opinion as to whether the hot, the cold, the moist and the dry were themselves used in cosmological theory as early as Anaximander. The view that the entities which separate off from Anaximander’s first principle, the Apeiron, are the hot and the cold, the dry and the moist, rests upon a single testimony of Simplicius (In phys. 150. 24 D.K.12A9). Elsewhere (In phys. 24. 13ff.) Simplicius, like Aristotle, leaves undetermined the precise nature of these entities. In this one passage, however, they are specified as the opposites, ‘the hot, the cold, the dry and the moist and the rest’. But, as even Kahn has to acknowledge, 9 Simplicius is here clearly ‘more concerned to explain Aristotle’s

-220-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Greek Rational Medicine: Philosophy and Medicine from Alcmaeon to the Alexandrians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Pre-Rational and Irrational Medicine in Greece and Neighbouring Cultures 6
  • 2 - Ionian Natural Philosophy and the Origins of Rational Medicine 26
  • 3 - Philosophy and Medicine in the Fifth Century I 47
  • 4 - Philosophy and Medicine in the Fifth Century II 82
  • 5 - Post-Hippocratic Medicine I 104
  • 6 - Post-Hippocratic Medicine II 149
  • 7 - Early Alexandrian Medical Science 177
  • Appendix 220
  • Notes 227
  • Bibliography 260
  • Index Locorum 278
  • General Index 287
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 296

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.