Philosophical Darwinism: On the Origin of Knowledge by Means of Natural Selection

By Peter Munz | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION: COGNITIVE CONDITIONS
1
‘Logic of Discovery or Psychology of Research?’, in I. Lakatos and A. Musgrave (eds), Criticism and the Growth of Knowledge, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1970, p. 20; see also G.M. Edelman, The Remembered Present, New York, Basic Books, 1989, p. 268: ‘Scientific procedure serves to correct perceptual and conceptual errors by communal action and agreement.’
2
Realism and the Aim of Knowledge, London, Routledge, 1982, pp. 12-13.
3
See J. Ziman, Public Knowledge, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1968.
4
See Peter Munz, Taking Darwin Even More Seriously’, in K. Hahlweg and C.A. Hooker (eds), Issues in Evolutionary Epistemology, New York, SUNY Press, 1989.
5
See, for example, Karl R. Popper, The Open Society and its Enemies, Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1950, pp. 416-17.
6
H.R. Maturana, The Tree of Knowledge, Boston, Random House, 1987, pp. 45-6.
7
Knowledge and the Flow of Information, Oxford, Blackwell, 1981, p. vii.
8
See, e.g., R. Kaspar, ‘Die Evolution erkenntnisgewinnender Mechanismen’, Biologie in unserer Zeit, 1980, 10.
9
The Remembered Present, New York, Basic Books, 1989, p. 7.
10
Julian Jaynes, The Origin of Consciousness in the Breakdown of the Bicameral Mind, Boston, Houghton Mifflin Co., 1976, speculates that consciousness originated round about 1400 BC. His belief that the anatomical link between the brain’s two hemispheres evolved as recently as that century seems bizarre.
11
A.J. Marcel, ‘Phenomenal Experience and Functionalism’, in A.J. Marcel and E. Bisiach (eds), Consciousness in Contemporary Science, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1988, p. 121. See also L.G. Roberts, ‘Machine Perception of Three-Dimensional Solids’, in T. Tippett et al. (eds), Optical and Electro-Optical Information Processing, Cambridge, Mass., MIT Press, 1965.
12
‘Scientific Reduction and the Essential Incompleteness of All Science’, in F.J. Ayala and T. Dobzhansky (eds), Studies in the Philosophy of Biology, London, Macmillan, 1974, p. 273.
13
Science, Man and Morals, London, Methuen, 1965, p. 53. The italics are mine and have been added in view of my argument below, that in the first instance, powerful consciousness was more like a by-product and probably an overkill. The point will be that only its retention was no accident.
14
The Principles of Psychology, New York, Dover, 1950 reprint, p. 225.
15
A Theory of Determinism, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1988, p. 82.
16
The Emperor’s New Mind, New York, Oxford University Press, 1989, p. 429. To

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Philosophical Darwinism: On the Origin of Knowledge by Means of Natural Selection
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Introduction - Cognitive Conditions 1
  • 1 - Man’s Glassy Essence 28
  • 2 - The Dubious Credentials of Positivism 81
  • 3 - The Lure of Sociology 103
  • 4 - The Nature of the Mirror 137
  • 5 - The View from Somewhere 185
  • Notes 230
  • Index 246
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