Court Patronage and Corruption in Early Stuart England

By Linda Levy Peck | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction

The fountain of favor
1
John Webster, The Dutchesse of Malfy (London, 1623), I,i; the passage centers on the importance of the court and of the king’s ridding it of flatterers. Antonio asked how he liked France, says


I admire it;
In seeking to reduce both State and People
To a fix’d Order, there juditious King
Begins at home: Quits first his Royal Palace
Of flattring Sicophants of dissolute,
And infamous persons, which he sweetely termes
His Masters Master’s-peece (the worke of Heaven)

The 1623 edition places quotation marks at the beginning of the line ‘“Death and diseases through the whole land spread” to underline its importance.

2
See Elisabeth B. MacDougall and Naomi Miller, Fons Sapientiae, Garden Fountains in Illustrated Books, Sixteenth-Eighteenth Centuries (Washington, D.C., 1977), ix-xii, p. 32, “Fons Justitiae;” Naomi Miller, French Renaissance Gardens (New York, 1977), pp. 17-20, 286-93; Donald R Dickson, The Fountain of Living Waters (Columbia, Mo., 1987). The image of the fountain is used in contemporary literature and letters such as Sir Francis Bacon’s dedication of the Advancement of Learning to the king.
3
John Stoughton, “The Magistrates Commission,” in Choice Sermons Preached Upon Selected Occasions (London, 1640), p. 9.
4
See K.B. MacFarlane, The Nobility of Later Medieval England (Oxford, 1973) and England in the Fifteenth Century (London, 1981), Lewis Namier, England in the Age of the American Revolution (2nd edn, New York, 1961); Roland Mousnier, La Venalité des offices en France sous Henry IV et Louis XIII (Rouen, 1945), and Les Hierarches sociales de 1450 a nos jours (Paris, 1966); Conrad Russell, Parliaments and English Politics, 1621-1629 (Oxford, 1979); Kevin Sharpe, Faction and Parliament (Oxford, 1978); David Starkey, “From Feud to Faction: English Politics Circa 1450-1550,” History Today, vol. 32 (1982),

-222-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Court Patronage and Corruption in Early Stuart England
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.