Dangerous Voices: Women's Laments and Greek Literature

By Gail Holst-Warhaft | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

Part of the contents of chapter 6 appeared in the Journal of Modern Greek Studies, October 1991. I am grateful to the editors for permission to use the material in this book.

The frontispiece was reproduced by kind permission of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1954.

I thank all my friends and colleagues who have given me material, discussed my work with me and offered their insights. They include Fred Ahl, Martin Bernal, Wayles Browne, Calum Carmichael, Sotiris Chianis, John Chioles, David Curzon, Vangelis Fambas, Steven Feld, Helene Foley, Sandor Goodhart, David Grossvogel, Janet Hart, Rudolf Käser, Lucia Lermond, Jean Lewis, David McCann, Kathryn March, Philip Mitsis, Charina and Francis Oeser, Jeff Rusten, Marcia and Barry Strauss, Karen Van Dyck, Kostas Vantzos, Ingeborg Wald and Olga Zissi. The Western Societies Program at Cornell University, under the imaginative guidance of Susan Tarrow and Sander Gilman, provided me with travel and study grants to complete my research.

I particularly want to thank three of my dear friends: Chana Kronfeld, whose painstaking criticism and encouragement helped me structure my own lament; Margaret Alexiou, whose work on lament was in large part the inspiration for this study and who gave my manuscript a generous, insightful reading; and Mariza Koch, who taught me how Greek women turn tears into ideas.

Zellman, Zoe and Simon helped put an end to laments.

-ix-

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