2

Anthropology and Structuralism

Bourdieu arrived in Algeria in 1956 as a soldier and a philosopher; he left in 1960 as a self-taught ethnographer and social anthropologist. He had published his first book and undertaken, in person and using research assistants, field research among the Kabyle peasantry of the Mahgreb and among the urban poor in Algiers and elsewhere. The body of data and ethnography thus accumulated was to provide him with enough material for a substantial body of published work over the subsequent decades. It is something to which, even yet, he still returns on occasions.

As a body of work, however, much of it is not particularly germane to this discussion. Sociologie de L’Algérie,[1] in particular, the first book referred to above, is primarily a compendium of information about the various ethnic groups which constituted Algerian society in the 1950s (although towards the end he does begin to say some more interesting things about the effects of war and the nature of the Algerian revolution). The two other collaborative early books on Algeria, about the Algerian working class, published in 1963, [2] and about the crisis in traditional Algerian agriculture, published a year later, [3] are, by and large, similarly prosaic. For much of their length they are almost irrel

-24-

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Pierre Bourdieu
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Key Sociologists 2
  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgements 7
  • 1 - A Book for Reading 9
  • 2 - Anthropology and Structuralism 24
  • 3 - Experiments in Epistemology 45
  • 4 - Practice, Habitus and Field 66
  • 5 - Symbolic Violence and Social Reproduction 103
  • 6 - Culture, Status and Distinction 128
  • 7 - Uses of Language 152
  • 8 - Using Bourdieu 175
  • Reading Bourdieu 182
  • Name Index 185
  • Subject Index 188
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