Rousing the Nation: Radical Culture in Depression America

By Laura Browder | Go to book overview

CHAPTER FIVE
FINDING A COLLECTIVE SOLUTION The Living Newspaper Experiment

Josephine Herbst opened up the radical novel to include women as subjects and even offered a model for turning readers into writers and activists, but she faced a problem common to Dos Passos, Farrell, and all the other radical novelists of the thirties. No matter how radicalizing a novel might be, it was designed to be consumed in private. It would take the Living Newspapers of the Federal Theatre Project to offer radical culture in a collective setting--and to enable those audience members to interact not only with one another but with the action taking place onstage.

In the late thirties, Josephine Herbst had two very different experiences working on the Living Newspapers that were the hallmark of the Federal Theatre Project. Although she was not working under the auspices of the government, she used the form that had become familiar to millions of theatergoers, basing her scripts on news events of the day and incorporating documentary sources such as newspapers and the Congressional Record. The first such attempt, which was successful, was written to be performed not in a theater but in an auto plant. The second Living Newspaper, written for the League of American Writers, would, for political reasons, never be produced. Both efforts exemplify the attractions and pitfalls of working in one of the most radical literary forms of the Depression decade. The most successful Living Newspapers were not, as might be expected, produced by Communist groups like the New Theatre League or workers' theater groups like the Blue Blouses, or by the Group Theatre, the Stanislavskian company headed by

-117-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rousing the Nation: Radical Culture in Depression America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.