Schooling for Change: Reinventing Education for Early Adolescents

By Andy Hargreaves; Jim Ryan et al. | Go to book overview

5

Care and Support

The Need for Support

Young adolescents, we have shown, experience several ‘rites of passage’. They go through puberty; they move from a family orientation to identification with a peer group; they transfer from one school to another and they begin to make personal and educational decisions that will have a long-lasting impact on their lives. This microcosmic world of self-exploration for young adolescents is embedded in the broader macrocosm of a world culture in transition, with national and world economies, social and ethnic makeup and global political structures changing at a dizzying pace. Young adolescents are a mirror image of their society, reflecting all of its problems (for example, learning difficulties, abuse, poverty, racism). They also experience a genuine concern about what the future will have to offer and about their place in it. As they face what is, for them, their first major ‘identity crisis’, young people need clear information, direction and extensive yet low-key support so they can develop a positive self concept, adjust to profound personal changes and acquire the coping skills, independence and critical judgment required to take their place in the larger community.

Providing support for young adolescents is a daunting task. Every school has enormous variability in the needs and requirements of its students according to age, maturity, achievement, family circumstances, interests, ambitions, ethnicity, gender and a whole host of other factors. Schools must serve not only their ‘at-risk’ students but the larger group of ‘mainstream’ students who need support as well. Indeed, we will see that one of the fallacies of secondary schooling and junior high schooling is that these schools can somehow remain indifferent or inhospitable places for the majority of their students who appear to be getting by, while mounting special, bolted-on programs for ‘at-risk’ students who don’t appear to fit. Supporting and caring well for students who are at risk means having schools organized and structured to support and care well for all students. One of the most compelling reasons for school restructuring is to create schools that are more welcoming, inclusive and caring communities for all their students—mainstream and at-risk alike—and not just ones that cruise along in the slipstream of their high academic achievers (Stoll and Fink, 1996).

-54-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Schooling for Change: Reinventing Education for Early Adolescents
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments vi
  • 1 - Triple Transitions 1
  • 2 - Adolescence and Adolescents 9
  • 3 - Cultures of Schooling 18
  • 4 - The Transition Process 35
  • 5 - Care and Support 54
  • 6 - Curriculum Problems 78
  • 7 - Outcomes and Integration 90
  • 8 - Assessment and Evaluation 112
  • 9 - Teaching and Learning 140
  • 10 - Getting There 159
  • References 178
  • Index 211
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.