Anton Bruckner, Rustic Genius

By Werner Wolff; Walter Damrosch | Go to book overview

CHAPTER V

BRUCKNER'S finances were indeed in poor shape at that time. In 1874 he had lost his position at St. Anna College and he was therefore dependent on his income from the Conservatory and from private lessons. His applications for other positions were rejected. Bruckner used a calendar as a diary and in it he noted daily events and happenings over a period of many years -- his expenses, his appointments, the names of girls who appealed to him, his pupils, his daily work and religious exercises. However, nothing in the calendar-diary is more interesting and pathetic than his numerous applications. We find there, for instance, for Thursday, September 27, 1877: "Third rejection of my Wagner Symphony No. 3. First rejected in fall, 1872. C Minor Symphony No. 2, 2nd rejection by the Philharmonic Orchestra, fall, '75. Symphony No. 3."

The document shows the inexorable severity of fate and the admirable stoicism of a man's heart. In those years of bitter experiences Bruckner was not spared humiliating remarks and advice from malicious people like the secretary of the Conservatory, Zellner, who answered his complaints with these words: "You had better throw your symphonies on a dung heap and make piano arrangements. That will mean more money for you." Fortunately, as we have mentioned earlier, Bruckner's financial troubles were greatly relieved by the income granted from the University and the Hofkapelle. His spirit, however, was unperturbed by outer events, since his will-power overcame all impediments and kept feeding his imagination, regardless of discouraging mishaps. His imagination worked on, spontaneously, and proved him a genius.

At the time of the first performance of the Third Symphony, the Fourth and the Fifth were already finished. The Fourth was written in 1874; the Fifth took much longer, for

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Anton Bruckner, Rustic Genius
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgment xii
  • Table of Contents xiii
  • Intr0ducti0n xv
  • Part I - Bruckner's Life and Personality 15
  • Chapter I 15
  • Chapter II 37
  • Chapter III 49
  • Chapter IV 64
  • Chapter V 85
  • Chapter VI 107
  • Chapter VII 124
  • Part II - Bruckner in the Light Of His Biographers 141
  • Chapter VIII 141
  • Part III - Psychic Forces Back Of Bruckner's Creative Imagination 149
  • Chapter IX 149
  • Part IV - Bruckner's Works 161
  • Chapter X 161
  • Chapter XII - The Nine Symphonies 180
  • Chapter XIII - The String Quintet, in F Major 253
  • Part V - Manuscript and Revised Score A Bruckner Problem of Recent Date 261
  • Chapter XIV 261
  • Appendix 271
  • Bibliography 275
  • Index 277
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