Eastern Europe, 1740-1985: Feudalism to Communism

By Robin Okey | Go to book overview

Appendix 1

Chronology of chief events mentioned in the text

The Danubian lands: Austria, Hungary, Czechoslovakia

1526

The Habsburgs acquire the Crowns of Hungary and Bohemia

1620

Battle of the White Mountain; end of Bohemian autonomy

1699

Treaty of Karlowitz; Turks withdraw from Hungary

1713

Pragmatic Sanction

1740-80 Reign of Maria Theresa

1740-9

War of Austrian Succession (1740-8); first reform period (1748-9)

1756-63

Seven Years War; second reform period starts (1760)

1771

Bohemian famine. Bohemian serf patent (1775)

1774

Universal primary education to be introduced

1780-90 Reign of Joseph II

1781

Toleration Edict; serfs no longer ‘bound to the soil’

1784

Hungarian royal crown removed to Vienna; German made official language of Hungary

1789

Tax law

1788-91

Austro-Turkish War

1792-1835 Reign of Francis I

1793-1815

Napoleonic wars; Vienna captured, 1805, 1809; Metternich chancellor, 1809

1818

Czech Museum founded; Czech Renaissance develops; Kollar’s Daughter of Slava (1824)

1825

Beginning of Hungarian reform movement; Szechenyi’s Credit (1830)

1835-48 Reign of Ferdinand

1842

Leseverein (reading union); beginnings of liberalism

-247-

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Eastern Europe, 1740-1985: Feudalism to Communism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Maps 6
  • Preface 9
  • 1 - The Feudal Inheritance 13
  • 2 - Enlightenment 35
  • 3 - Liberalism and Nationalism 59
  • 4 - Storm and Settlement, 1848-70 84
  • 5 - Economics and Society, 1850-1914 110
  • 6 - Politics, 1870-1918 133
  • 7 - Independent Eastern Europe 157
  • 8 - From Hitler to Stalin 181
  • 9 - Communist Eastern Europe 205
  • 10 - Epilogue 241
  • Appendix 1 247
  • Appendix 2 251
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 273
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