Eastern Europe, 1740-1985: Feudalism to Communism

By Robin Okey | Go to book overview

Appendix 2

Glossary
amortization funds Funds set aside to pay off the cost of a loan for investment purposes.
boyars Romanian nobles.
cameralism In economics, the Central European variant of the mercantilist doctrines of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, which prescribed state action for the increase of prosperity.
capital-output ratio The rate by which a given increase in investment increases the volume of output.
Chetniks Guerilla fighters: in particular, the Serbian nationalist resistance movement in the Second World War.
chiftluk sahibije Turkish—a category of Ottoman landowners, expanding from the seventeenth century, who, unlike the spahis, treated their estates as private property over which they exercised semi-feudal powers, constraining the peasants to share-cropping and forced labour.
collectivization A type of socialized agriculture introduced by Stalin into the Soviet Union from 1929, in which peasants farm the bulk of the land collectively, while retaining small plots for private use.
Comecon The Council for Mutual Economic Assistance (CMEA), set up in 1949 to facilitate and co-ordinate economic development of socialist bloc countries.
Cossacks From the sixteenth to the eighteenth century, inhabitants of the unsettled Ukrainian border lands between Poland, the Ottoman empire and Muscovy, living in fortified villages free from any lord.
Daco-Romanian aspirations The concept of a Greater Romania encompassing all Romanian speakers, so-called from the Roman province of Dacia (founded c. 106 AD), from which Romanians trace their national origins.
exarchate In Orthodox Christianity, an ecclesiastical province enjoying autonomy under a patriarchate.
Haiduks Christian brigands on Slav territory in the Balkans under Ottoman rule.

-251-

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Eastern Europe, 1740-1985: Feudalism to Communism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Maps 6
  • Preface 9
  • 1 - The Feudal Inheritance 13
  • 2 - Enlightenment 35
  • 3 - Liberalism and Nationalism 59
  • 4 - Storm and Settlement, 1848-70 84
  • 5 - Economics and Society, 1850-1914 110
  • 6 - Politics, 1870-1918 133
  • 7 - Independent Eastern Europe 157
  • 8 - From Hitler to Stalin 181
  • 9 - Communist Eastern Europe 205
  • 10 - Epilogue 241
  • Appendix 1 247
  • Appendix 2 251
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 273
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