Eastern Europe, 1740-1985: Feudalism to Communism

By Robin Okey | Go to book overview

Bibliography

This bibliography has been framed with the needs of teaching rather than scholarship in mind. Consequently, it is based on English language material, with a sprinkling of works in French. A knowledge of German opens many a further door. Selection has been shaped by the emphases of the text and, as far as possible, is limited to books which are either eminently readable or offer unique insights or information. Obviously, for reasons of space many books which have one or all of these qualities have had to be omitted. As a further practical aid, articles have been included whenever these broach a broad field or offer a short cut to views expressed in better-known but lengthier works.

No other book sets itself quite the same task as this one. A.W. Palmer’s The Lands Between: A History of East—Central Europe since the Congress of Vienna (London 1970) offers a somewhat traditional narrative for the period after 1815. I.T. Berend and G. Ranki, in East Central Europe in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries (Budapest 1977), cover the years 1848-1945 with a heavy socio-economic emphasis. There is a fine set of relevant documents in S. Fischer-Galati’s Man, State and Society in East European History (New York 1970).

Barbara Jelavich takes on a substantial chunk of our area in her History of the Balkans, vol. 1: the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries; vol 2: Twentieth Century (Cambridge 1983). Likewise the Habsburg Monarchy is covered in C.A. Macartney, The Habsburg Empire (London 1969); V.L. Tapié, The Rise and Fall of the Habsburg Monarchy (Paris 1969; English trans., London 1971); and R.A. Kann, A History of the Habsburg Empire, 1526-1918 (Berkeley, California 1974). Of these famous scholars Tapié has best combined analysis and narrative flow; C.A. Macartney’s rather detailed text is available in more convenient, condensed form

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Eastern Europe, 1740-1985: Feudalism to Communism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Maps 6
  • Preface 9
  • 1 - The Feudal Inheritance 13
  • 2 - Enlightenment 35
  • 3 - Liberalism and Nationalism 59
  • 4 - Storm and Settlement, 1848-70 84
  • 5 - Economics and Society, 1850-1914 110
  • 6 - Politics, 1870-1918 133
  • 7 - Independent Eastern Europe 157
  • 8 - From Hitler to Stalin 181
  • 9 - Communist Eastern Europe 205
  • 10 - Epilogue 241
  • Appendix 1 247
  • Appendix 2 251
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 273
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