Infancy and Culture: An International Review and Source Book

By Hiram E.Fitzgerald; Rosalind B.Johnson et al. | Go to book overview

and low socioeconomic status. Knowledge of Latino infants from low-SES families needs to continue to expand, as does research including other economic groups across all of the subgroups of the greater Latino population. There is a need for research focusing on broader aspects of infant development, including cultural factors and their influence on infant development for the many subcultures of the Latino people.


REFERENCES

c
COSSMHO: The National Coalition of Hispanic Health and Human Service Organizations (1993). Growing up Hispanic. Washington, DC: Author.
Cuellar, J. (1990). Hispanic American aging: Geriatric education curriculum development for selected health professionals. In Minority aging: Essential curricula content for selected health and allied health professionals (DHHS Publication No. HRSPDV 901). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

e
Enchautegui, M. (1995). Policy implication of Latino poverty. Washington, DC: The Urban Institute.

n
Novello, A. (1991). Hispanic health: time for data, time for action. Journal of the American Medical Association 265, 253-255.

u
U.S. Bureau of the Census, March (1988).
U.S. Bureau of the Census (1990). The Hispanic populations in the United States. Current Population Reports. Series P-20, No. 444. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office.
U.S. Bureau of the Census (1995). March 1994 current population survey, Hispanic data. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

RESOURCES
199. Angel, R. (1988). Single motherhood and children’s health. Journal of Health & Social Behavior, 29, 38-52.

The effect of a mother’s marital status on her report of her child’s health for Mexican American, black, and non-Hispanic white children aged 6 months to 11 years was investigated. Single mothers reported poorer overall physical health for their children than did mothers in intact marriages. Mexican American mothers’ depression scores were among the most significant predictors of their assessments of their children’s health.

200. Arcia, E. (1994). Indicators of developmental and functional status of MexicanAmerican and Puerto Rican children. Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, 15, 27-33.

Indicators of developmental need for special services (LBW, use of NICU, congenital problems, chronic conditions of developmental concern, functional limitations, and physician diagnoses of medical conditions) were examined for Mexican American and Puerto Rican children. Puerto Rican children had substantially poorer status than Mexican American children, who, in turn, had indicators comparable to those reported for the general population.

201. Beckwith, L. (1984). Parent interaction with their preterm infants and later mental development. Early Child Development & Care, 16, 27-40.

A study with preterm infants demonstrated that most performed in the normal range on the Gesell Developmental Schedule and the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale. However, Hispanic infants and lower-SES Anglo infants showed a performance

-70-

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