Infancy and Culture: An International Review and Source Book

By Hiram E.Fitzgerald; Rosalind B.Johnson et al. | Go to book overview

REFERENCES

d
Dana, R.H. (1993). Multicultural assessment perspectives for professional psychology. Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
Davis, L. (1994). Children of the East. London: Janus.

l
Lavi, Z. (Ed.). (1990). Kibbutz members study kibbutz children. New York: Greenwood Press.

m
Montagu, J. (Ed.). (1992). Children at crisis point. London: The Save the Children Fund.

r
Roopnarine, J.L., & Hossain, Z. (1992). Parent-child interactions in urban Indian families in New Delhi: Are they changing? In J.L. Roopnarine & D.B. Carter (Eds.). Parent-child socialization in different cultures (pp. 1-16). Norwood, NJ: Ablex.

s
Slonim, M.B. (1991). Children, culture, and ethnicity: Evaluating and understanding the impact. New York: Garland.

u
UNICEF. (1988). The child in South Asia: Issues in development as if children mattered. New Delhi, India: United Nations Children’s Fund.
United Nations Children’s Fund and United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (1988). Far Eastern economic review: Asia and Pacific atlas of children in national development. Bangkok, Thailand: UNICEF East Asia and Pakistan Regional Office.

RESOURCES
335. Banik, N., Krishna, R., Mane, S., & Raj, L. (1967). A study of birth weight of Indian infants and its relationship to sex, period of gestation, maternal age, parity and socioeconomic classes. Indian Journal of Medical Research, 55, 1378-1386.
336. Boo, N.Y., Lye, M.S., & Ong, L.C. (1994). Intrauterine growth of liveborn Malaysian infants between gestation of 28 to 42 weeks. Singapore Medical Journal, 35, 163-166.

Intrauterine growth rates of Malay, Chinese, and Indian infants were compared. After 34 weeks’ gestation, neonates of mothers with multiple children weighed more than neonates of first-time mothers; Indian neonates were significantly lighter than the Chinese and Malay neonates; and males were heavier than females. Above 35 and 36 weeks’ gestation, head circumference and body length, respectively, were significantly influenced by ethnic origin, sex, and/or first-time motherhood.

337. Bornstein, M., Tal, J., Rahn, C., Galperin, C., Lamour, M., Oginio, M., Pecheux, M., Toda, S., Azuma, H., & Tamis-LeMonda, C. (1992). Functional analysis of the contents of maternal speech to infants of 5 and 13 months in four cultures: Argentina, France, Japan, and the United States. Developmental Psychology, 28, 593-603.

Mothers in all 4 countries speak to their five- or 13-month old infants in all ways studied, but the emphasis of the speech differed, which may be due to cultural differences. Mothers of the older babies spoke more than mothers of the younger babies.

338. Bornstein, M., Maital, S., Tal, J., & Baras, R. (1995). Mother and infant activity and interaction in Israel and in the United States: A comparative study. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 18, 63-82.

Home activities and interactions of Israeli and U.S. mothers (total n=55) and their five-month-old infants were observed for infant visual and tactual exploration and vocalization, and maternal stimulation and speech. Israeli and U.S. mothers may follow culture-specific paths in striving to meet infants’ needs and in achieving socialization goals.

339. Brooke, O.G., Wood, C., Butters, F. (1984). The body proportions for small-fordates infants. Early Human Development, 10, 85-94.

-126-

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