France and Germany at Maastricht: Politics and Negotiations to Create the European Union

By Colette Mazzucelli | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I

Introduction

The rulers of our countries, taken separately, are responsible today, as yesterday, to defend a certain conception of the national interest resulting from numerous influences among which the most conservative have the greatest weight. However clear-sighted they may be, it is difficult, almost impossible, for them to change those things which exist and which they are responsible to administer. They can wish to do so in their innermost convictions, but they must be accountable to their Parliament, to public opinion, and they are often slowed down by their own departments which want to keep everything in order. This is all quite natural. If governments and administrations were ready at any moment to change the existing order of things, this would be a state of incessant disorder. I know from experience that change can only come from external forces under the influence of necessity, but inevitably not from violence.

Jean Monnet, Mémoires

This volume analyzes French and German diplomacy during the intergovernmental conferences (IGCs) on economic and monetary union (EMU) and political union and the subsequent national treaty ratification process in each country. It uses various approaches to explore the domestic-international interactions predominant during internal bargaining in Paris and Bonn and external negotiations at different levels among working groups, personal representatives, ministers and political leaders in Brussels.

Why is this topic important? There are at least two reasons. The historic importance of Franco-German relations in the European Community (EC) is an essential starting point.1 For over thirty years, the “privileged partnership” has launched initiatives in European construction. The European Monetary

1F. Roy Willis, France, Germany and the New Europe (London: Stanford University Press, 1968); Haig Simonian, The Privileged Partnership (Oxford: Clarendon, 1985); Julius W. Friend, The Linchpin: French-German Relations, 1950-1990 (New York: Praeger with CSIS, 1991); Robert Picht (Hg.), Das Bündnis im Bündnis (Berlin: Severin und Siedler, 1982); Ernst Weisenfeld, Quelle Allemagne pour la France? (Paris: Armand Colin, 1989); Patrick McCarthy, ed., France—Germany 1983-1993 (New York: Macmillan, 1993).

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
France and Germany at Maastricht: Politics and Negotiations to Create the European Union
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 356

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.