Education under Siege: The Conservative, Liberal and Radical Debate over Schooling

By Stanley Aronowitz; Henry Giroux | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

We would like to thank Ralph Page, Lindsay Fitzclarence, Jeanne Brady Giroux, and Richard Quantz for having read substantial sections of this book and for providing invaluable criticisms. We are grateful to Jan Fulton and Fran Shaloe for their patience and skill in typing much of this manuscript. Thanks, again, to Rosa. We would also like to thank Dean Jan Kettlewell and Professor Nelda Cameron-McCabe of Miami University for the time, support, and professional encouragement they provided for Henry Giroux after his exodus from Boston University. Of course, we are solely responsible for the book in its final form.

Some of the chapters in this book appeared in slightly or substantially altered form in the following journals: Harvard Educational Review, College English, Curriculum Inquiry, Journal of Education, Educational Theory, Issues in Education, New Education (Australia). An altered version of Chapter 2 was written for a colloquium at Suffolk University on “Creativity and the Implementation of Change: Liberal Learning in the Practical World,” February 20-21, 1985. For the past seven years, the two of us have been involved in a collaboration over the relationship between pedagogy and politics and the evolving vision of emancipatory and transformative education. During that time, some of the articles in this book initially were written and published under separate authorship though they had almost always been mutually discussed and influenced by our joint work. In writing the book itself, we jointly authored a number of chapters, and in other instances rewrote and edited work that we incorporated, but, in all cases, each chapter was the final product of an editing and writing process that allows us to view the book in its published form as a strictly collaborative effort. It is an effort characterized by a warmly held friendship as well as a deeply shared belief in the need to struggle for a better world for all human beings.

-xiii-

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