Education under Siege: The Conservative, Liberal and Radical Debate over Schooling

By Stanley Aronowitz; Henry Giroux | Go to book overview

NOTES
1.
Chester Finn. “A Call for Quality Education,” American Education (January-February, 1982), p. 32.
2.
Ibid., p. 33.
3.
Ibid., pp. 33-36.
4.
Paul Willis, Learning to Labor (New York: Columbia University Press, 1981).
5.
John Dewey, Democracy and Education (New York: Free Press, 1966), p. 200.
6.
Ibid., pp. 339-340.
7.
Ibid., pp. 340-341.
8.
Antonio Gramsci, Selections From Prison Notebooks, ed. and trans. Quinten Hoare and Geoffrey Smith (New York: International Publishers, 1971), p. 33.
9.
Ibid., p. 37.
10.
Paulo Friere, Pedagogy of the Oppressed (New York: Seabury Press, 1973); also see The Politics of Education (South Hadley, Mass.: Bergin and Garvey, 1984).
11.
Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer, Dialectic of the Enlightenment (New York: Seabury Press, 1972); Herbert Marcuse, One Dimensional Man (Boston: Beacon Press, 1964).
12.
Henri Lefebvre, Everyday Life in the Modern World (New York: Harper and Row Publishers, 1968); C. Wright Mills, The Sociological Imagination (London: Oxford University Press, 1959).
13.
David Noble, America By Design (New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1977).
14.
Harry Braverman, Labor and Monopoly Capital (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1974).
15.
George Lukacs, History and Class Consciousness (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1968).
16.
Seymour Papert, Mind Storms (New York; Basic Books, 1980).
17.
H.A. Simon, The Science of the Artificial (Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1969).
18.
Edmund Sullivan, “Computers, Culture and Educational Futures,” Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Unpublished paper, 1984.
19.
Joseph Weizenbaum, Computers and Human Reason (New York: W.H. Freeman Co., 1976).
20.
B.F. Skinner, About Behaviorism (New York: Alfred A. Knopf Publishers, 1974); C. Shannon, Mathematical Theory of Communication (Urbana, III.: University of Illinois, 1975); Simon, op. cit.
21.
W. Reich, Sex-Pol, ed. Lee Baxandall (New York: Vintage Books, 1972); Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattare, Anti Oedipus: Capitalism and Schizophrenia (New York: Viking Press, 1977); Jürgen Habermas, Communication and the Evolution of Society, trans. by Thomas McCarthy (Boston: Beacon Press, 1979).

-21-

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