Education under Siege: The Conservative, Liberal and Radical Debate over Schooling

By Stanley Aronowitz; Henry Giroux | Go to book overview

NINE

Is Computer Technology the Answer? The Crisis in the Classroom and Educational Reform

A DECADE AGO, radical critics argued that, contrary to the mainstream contention that schools were great levelers of class and social differences, they were really training institutions for the labor market. Since the labor market supplied workers for factories and offices in which most occupations were degraded regardless of the supposed skills required to perform them, the schools reproduced the workplace. According to its left critics, American education was similarly degraded (see chapters five and six).

In the 1970s the force of this critique was somewhat muted by the fiscal crisis of the public sector, by cutbacks prompted during the recession of the early 1980s, and by the consequent downgrading of education in the hierarchy of public policy priorities. Political concern with the fate of the schools varied, it seemed, with the market conditions. In a period when all types of labor were oversupplied, the policy problem was not how to create more effective schools, but how to reduce their capacity to turn out credentialized labor which had, to the embarrassment of almost everybody, suddenly found itself massively unemployed.

Nothing has changed in the mid-1980s, but the pendulum appears to have swung back to a new focus on schools, their performance, and most of all, their ability to supply the highly skilled workforce required by the rapid and relentless introduction of new technologies in the workplace. Although the so-called “computer revolution” is not new, there is no doubt that computer-mediated work is fast becoming the sine qua non of most work in the “growth” sector of the economy, the tertiary sectors such as financial services, retailing, and wholesale and information services associated with public and private administration.

-185-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Education under Siege: The Conservative, Liberal and Radical Debate over Schooling
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 240

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.