ACT III

Eight days have passed, and the scene is a London Police Court at one o'clock. A canopied seat of Justice is surmounted by the lion and unicorn. Before the fire a worn-looking MAGISTRATE is warming his coat-tails, and staring at two little girls in faded blue and orange rags, who are placed before the dock. Close to the witness-box is a RELIEVING OFFICER in an overcoat, and a short brown beard. Beside the little girls stands a bald POLICE CONSTABLE. On the front bench are sitting BARTHWICKand ROPER, and behind them JACK. In the railed enclosure are seedy-looking men and women. Some prosperous constables sit or stand about.

MAGISTRATE. [In hie paternal and ferocious voice, hissing his s's.] Now let us dispose of these young ladies.

USHER. Theresa Livens, Maud Livens.

[The bald CONSTABLE indicates the little girls, who remain silent, disillusioned, inattentive.]

Relieving Officer!

[The RELIEVING OFFICER steps into the witnessbox.]

USHER. The evidence you give to the Court shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God! Kiss the book!

[The book is kissed.

RELIEVING OFFICER. [In a monotone, pausing slightly at each sentence end, that his evidence may be incribed.] About ten o'clock this morning, your Worship, I found these two little girls in Blue Street, Pulham, crying outside a public-house. Asked where their home was, they said they had no home. Mother had gone away. Asked about their father. Their father had no work. Asked where they slept last night. At their aunt's. I've made inquiries, your Wor-

-53-

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Representative Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Contents *
  • The Silver Box - A Comedy in Three Acts 1
  • Act I 3
  • Scene II 6
  • Scene III 11
  • Scene III 28
  • Scene III 28
  • Scene III 36
  • Act III 53
  • Strife - A Drama in Three Acts 73
  • Act II 102
  • Act II 102
  • Act II 119
  • Act II 134
  • Justice - A Tragedy in Four Acts 161
  • Act II 181
  • Act II 209
  • Act II 209
  • Scene II 218
  • Scene III 226
  • Act IV 229
  • The Pigeon - A Drama in Three Acts 249
  • Act II 273
  • Act II 299
  • A Bit O'Love - A Play in Three Acts 319
  • Act II 344
  • Act II 344
  • Act II 357
  • Act II 364
  • Act III 368
  • Scene II 377
  • Loyalties 387
  • Loyalties 389
  • Scene II 417
  • Act II 417
  • Act II 438
  • Act II 438
  • Act II 455
  • Act II 462
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