him any good; but then I could say the same of a lot of them -- they'd get on better in the shops, there's no doubt.

THE GOVERNOR. You mean you'd have to recommend others?

THE DOCTOR. A dozen at least. It's on his nerves. There's nothing tangible. That fellow there [pointing to O'CLEARY'S cell], for instance -- feels it just as much, in his way. If I once get away from physical facts -- I shan't know where I am. Conscientiously, sir, I don't know how to differentiate him. He hasn't lost weight. Nothing wrong with his eyes. His pulse is good. Talks all right.

THE GOVERNOR. It doesn't amount to melancholia?

THE DOCTOR. [Shaking his head.] I can report on him if you like; but if I do I ought to report on others.

THE GOVERNOR. I see. [Looking towards FALDER'S cell.] The poor devil must just stick it then.

[As he says this he looks absently at WOODER.

WOODER. Beg pardon, sir?

[For answer the GOVERNOR stares at him, turns on his heel, and walks away. There is a sound as of beating on metal.]

THE GOVERNOR. [Stopping.] Mr. Wooder?

WOODER. Banging on his door, sir. I thought we should have more of that.

[He hurries forward, passing the GOVERNOR, who follows closely.]

The curtain falls.


SCENE III

FALDER'S cell, a whitewashed space thirteen feet broad by seven deep, and nine feet high, with a rounded ceiling.

-226-

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Representative Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Contents *
  • The Silver Box - A Comedy in Three Acts 1
  • Act I 3
  • Scene II 6
  • Scene III 11
  • Scene III 28
  • Scene III 28
  • Scene III 36
  • Act III 53
  • Strife - A Drama in Three Acts 73
  • Act II 102
  • Act II 102
  • Act II 119
  • Act II 134
  • Justice - A Tragedy in Four Acts 161
  • Act II 181
  • Act II 209
  • Act II 209
  • Scene II 218
  • Scene III 226
  • Act IV 229
  • The Pigeon - A Drama in Three Acts 249
  • Act II 273
  • Act II 299
  • A Bit O'Love - A Play in Three Acts 319
  • Act II 344
  • Act II 344
  • Act II 357
  • Act II 364
  • Act III 368
  • Scene II 377
  • Loyalties 387
  • Loyalties 389
  • Scene II 417
  • Act II 417
  • Act II 438
  • Act II 438
  • Act II 455
  • Act II 462
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