MABEL. [Her face averted.] That he was robbing us. [Turning to him suddenly.] Ronny -- you -- didn't? I'd rather know.

DANCY. Ha! I thought that was coming.

MABEL. [Covering her face.] Oh! How horrible of me -- how horrible!

DANCY. Not at all. The thing looks bad.

MABEL. [Dropping her hands.] If I can't believe in you, who can? [Going to him, throwing her arms round him, and looking up into his face.] Ronny! If all the world -- I'd believe in you. You know I would.

DANCY. That's all right, Mabs! That's all right! [His face, above her head, is contorted for a moment, then hardens into a mask.] Well, what shall we do?

MABEL. Oh! Let's go to that lawyer -- let's go at once!

DANCY. All right. Get your hat on.

[MABEL passes him, and goe into the bedroom, Left. DANCY, left alone, stands quite still, staring before him. With a sudden shrug of his shoulders he moves quickly to his hat and takes it up just as MABEL returns, ready to go out. He opens the door; and crossing him, she stops in the doorway, looking up with a clear and trustful gaze as

The curtain falls.


ACT III

SCENE I

Three months later. Old MR. JACOB TWISDEN'S Room, at the offices of Twisden & Graviter, in Lincoln's Inn Fields, is spacious, with two large windows at back,

-438-

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Representative Plays
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Introduction v
  • Contents *
  • The Silver Box - A Comedy in Three Acts 1
  • Act I 3
  • Scene II 6
  • Scene III 11
  • Scene III 28
  • Scene III 28
  • Scene III 36
  • Act III 53
  • Strife - A Drama in Three Acts 73
  • Act II 102
  • Act II 102
  • Act II 119
  • Act II 134
  • Justice - A Tragedy in Four Acts 161
  • Act II 181
  • Act II 209
  • Act II 209
  • Scene II 218
  • Scene III 226
  • Act IV 229
  • The Pigeon - A Drama in Three Acts 249
  • Act II 273
  • Act II 299
  • A Bit O'Love - A Play in Three Acts 319
  • Act II 344
  • Act II 344
  • Act II 357
  • Act II 364
  • Act III 368
  • Scene II 377
  • Loyalties 387
  • Loyalties 389
  • Scene II 417
  • Act II 417
  • Act II 438
  • Act II 438
  • Act II 455
  • Act II 462
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