Chapter Two

Changing conceptions of the nature of drug abuse

Gillian Tober

The drug-taker’s tale

PJ is 21. She has just finished making a television documentary on ‘heroin addiction’. Her mother, who organises a support group for the parents of drug addicts, persuaded her to do it. All it involved was telling her story—her past, her present, and how she saw the future. She remembered her childhood quite well; her mother was often away from home or intoxicated at home when she was quite small; she had a slightly older sister whom she seemed to follow through life. PJ remembers first going to school, a year after her sister had started, remembers feeling so shy and frightened of the other children she would hide under the coats in the cloakroom. She remembers her sister always being good at things—school, music, sports—she remembers wanting to be special or clever at something. Most of her school years were uncomfortable—she never seemed to know how to make friends or be friends with other people.

At the age of 13 she began listening to rock’n’roll music and then going to concerts. One day some older children from school recognised her at a concert and invited her to join them. They were smoking cannabis and offered her some. She accepted, mainly because it was what they were doing and she was flattered to be asked to join them. She enjoyed the effect of the cannabis—because it made the music sound better and made her feel more relaxed about being younger than the others. It made her feel grown-up.

From then on PJ looked out for the same group of youngsters at concerts and regularly joined them, smoked cannabis with them and had a good time. After a few months she was at a concert where her friends knew the boys in the band; they all went off to a party afterwards and PJ was invited along. At the party there were drugs other than cannabis—some white powder people were snorting off mirrors through twenty pound notes. PJ was intrigued; when offered

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Treating Drug Abusers
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 202

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.