X

CAVOUR AND GARIBALDI

IF Cavour had had his way there would have been no immediate sequel in the south to the war of liberation in the north. With the absorption of Lombardy, the Duchies, Tuscany and the Romagna, all that war and diplomacy could achieve had been achieved. For Cavour, therefore, with his fine sense of the possible, this was the time to stop—not as a matter of principle, but of practical politics. Rome and Venetia could not for the moment be attained because of the insuperable international obstacles. As for the Bourbon kingdom, it could be acquired only by war, even if Cavour wanted it; and as an astute politician and diplomat, he saw that an attack on the Two Sicilies was out of the question. It is not at all certain that he was much interested in the matter.

Garibaldi was interested, however; and unlike Cavour he believed in the impossible. He wanted Venetia, Rome and the Two Sicilies, and he wanted them united into an Italian kingdom under the flag of the House of Savoy. His object when he set sail with the Thousand was to get all three but he aimed chiefly at getting Rome and Venetia by a large-scale outflanking movement. It was Garibaldi and not Cavour whose policy it was to unite Italy by revolution from the south because diplomacy had made it impossible to do so from the north. Cavour said later that it was his policy. But stealing other people’s slogans is a common habit among politicians. It is usual to say that Cavour encouraged Garibaldi in secret; according to some because he regarded Garibaldi as an ally, and according to others because he intended from the

-79-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Vienna to Versailles
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Maps vi
  • Preface vii
  • Bibliography ix
  • Supplementary Bibliography xi
  • I - The Vienna Settlement 1
  • II - The Congress System and the Holy Alliance 1815-1820 10
  • III - The Holy Alliance, Europe and the East 1820-1841 16
  • IV - The Crimean War— Causes and Consequences 23
  • V - Revolution: Origins 32
  • VI - 1815-1848: The Age of Frustration 38
  • VII - 1848: Year of Failure 49
  • VIII - Louis Napoleon, Second Republic and Second Empire 55
  • IX - Napoleon III and Cavour 69
  • X - Cavour and Garibaldi 79
  • XI - Bismarck and Germany 1862-1871 96
  • XII - Bismarck and Germany 1871-1890 120
  • XIII - Imperial Conflicts and European Alignments 1875-1907 130
  • XIV - Cry Havoc…1907-1914 157
  • XV - Through War to Peace 1914-1920 186
  • Index 213
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 216

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.