Primary Teachers Talking: A Study of Teaching as Work

By Jennifer Nias | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

I am very grateful to Muriel Last and Andrew Pollard for their helpful comments on draft chapters and to all those others who have offered encouraging or critical reflections on earlier versions of material contained in this book. Notwithstanding, any mistakes and misinterpretations which remain are my own.

Without the skill, perspicacity and long suffering of Angie Ashton and Fiona Weideking, this book would never have been written. I am very grateful to them both. I would also like to make appreciative acknowledgement of the assistance I received from the University of Liverpool during the early stages of the research reported here and, more recently, of the support I have been given by the teaching and non-teaching staff of the Cambridge Institute of Education.

Finally, but most importantly, I would like to thank the teachers who made this book possible and from whom I have learnt so much.

Chapters 3, 4, 5, and 6 include extracts from three previously published papers—‘Reference groups in primary teaching: talking, listening and identity’ in S. Ball and I. Goodson (eds) 1985, Teachers’ Lives and Careers, Lewes: Falmer Press; ‘A more distant drummer: teacher development as the development of self’ in L. Barton and S. Walker (eds) 1985, Education and Social Change, London: Croom Helm; ‘Leadership styles and job satisfaction in primary schools’ in T. Bush et al. (eds) 1980, Approaches to School Management, London: Harper & Row.

Parts of Chapters 1, 2, 5, 6, and 7 have also appeared in ‘Teaching and the Self’, Cambridge Journal of Education, 17: 1987; ‘The definition and maintenance of self in primary teaching’, British Journal of Sociology of Education, 5: 1984; ‘Commitment and motivation in primary school teachers’, Educational Review, 33: 1981; ‘Teacher satisfaction and dissatisfaction: Herzberg’s twofactor hypothesis revisited’, British Journal of Sociology ofEducation, 2: 1981; ‘Learning and acting the role: in-school support for primary teachers’, Educational Review, 36: 1984. I am grateful to the publishers for permission to use them here.

-vii-

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