Encyclopedia of Literature and Criticism

By Martin Coyle; Peter Garside et al. | Go to book overview

FURTHER READING
Brooks, Cleanth (1968) The Well Wrought Urn: Studies in the Structure of Poetry, Methuen, London [first published 1947]
Fekete, John (1977) The Critical Twilight: Explorations in the Ideology of Anglo-American Literary Theory from Eliot to McLuhan, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London
Krieger, Murray (1977) The New Apologists for Poetry, Greenwood Press, Westport [first published 1956]
Lentricchia, Frank (1980) After the New Criticism, Athlone Press, London
Ransom, John Crowe (1941) The New Criticism, New Directions, Norfolk
——(1964) The World’s Body, Kennikat Press, New York [first published 1938]
Robey, David (1982) ‘Anglo-American New Criticism’. In Ann Jefferson and David Robey (eds), Modern Literary Theory: A Comparative Introduction, Batsford, London, pp. 65-83
Stewart, John L. (1965) The Burden of Time: The Fugitives and Agrarians, Princeton University Press, Princeton
Thompson, Ewa M. (1971) Russian Formalism and Anglo-American New Criticism: A Comparative Study, Mouton, The Hague
Wellek, René (1963) Concepts of Criticism, Yale University Press, New Haven
Wellek, René and Warren, Austin (1973) Theory of Literature, Penguin, Harmondsworth [first published 1949]
Wimsatt, W.K., Jr. (1970) The Verbal Icon: Studies in the Meaning of Poetry, Methuen, London [first published 1954]

ADDITIONAL WORKS CITED
Allot, Miriam (ed.) (1970) The Poems of John Keats, Longman, London
Brooks, Cleanth (1948) Modern Poetry and the Tradition, Editions Poetry, London [first published 1939]
Brooks, Cleanth and Warren, Robert Penn (eds) (1938) Understanding Poetry: An Anthology for College Students, Henry Holt, New York
——(eds) (1943) Understanding Fiction, Appleton-Century-Crofts, New York
Lasch, Christopher (1973) The Agony of the American Left: One Hundred Years of Radicalism, Pelican, Harmondsworth
Mulhern, Francis (1979) The Moment of ‘Scrutiny’, Verso, London
Ransom, John Crowe (1951a) ‘Criticism as Pure Speculation’. In Morton D. Zabel (ed.), Literary Opinion in America, 2nd edn, Harper, New York, pp. 639-54 [essay first published 1941]
——(ed.) (1951b) The Kenyon Critics: Studies in Modern Literature from the ‘Kenyon Review’, Kennikat Press, New York
Tate, Allen (1936) Reactionary Essays on Poetry and Ideas, Charles Scribner’s Sons, New York
——(1952) ‘The Present Function of Criticism’. In Ray B. West (ed.), Essays in Modern Literary Criticism , Holt, Rinehart & Winston, New York, pp. 145-54 [essay first published 1940]
Trilling, Lionel (1970) ‘The Meaning of a Literary Idea’. In Lionel Trilling, The Liberal

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Encyclopedia of Literature and Criticism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements xiii
  • Preface xvii
  • I - Introduction 1
  • 1 - Literature 3
  • Further Reading 24
  • Additional Works Cited 25
  • 2 - Criticism 27
  • Further Reading 63
  • II - Literature and History 67
  • 3 - Medieval Literature and the Medieval World 69
  • Further Reading 80
  • 4 - The Renaissance 82
  • 5 - Augustanism 93
  • Additional Works Cited 105
  • 6 - Romanticism 106
  • 7 - Modernism 119
  • Further Reading 129
  • 8 - Postmodernism 131
  • III - Poetry 149
  • 9 - Genre 151
  • Further Reading 162
  • 10 - Poetry 164
  • Additional Works Cited 176
  • 11 - Epic and Romance 177
  • 12 - Lyric 188
  • Further Reading 197
  • 13 - Narrative Verse 199
  • Further Reading 207
  • 14 - Women and the Poetic Tradition: The Oppressor’s Language 208
  • 15 - Medieval Poetry 223
  • Additional Works Cited 238
  • 16 - Renaissance Poetry 239
  • Additional Works Cited 250
  • 17 - ‘Augustan’ Poetry 253
  • 18 - Romantic Poetry 265
  • Further Reading 276
  • 19 - Victorian Poetry 278
  • 20 - The French Symbolists 295
  • Further Reading 306
  • 21 - Modern Poetry 308
  • 22 - British Poetry since 1945: Poetry and the Historical Moment 321
  • 23 - Contemporary American Poetry 336
  • IV - Drama 349
  • 24 - Stagecraft 351
  • Further Reading 361
  • 25 - Tragedy 363
  • Further Reading 374
  • 26 - Comedy 375
  • Further Reading 385
  • 27 - Shakespeare 387
  • Additional Works Cited 399
  • 28 - Medieval Drama 400
  • 29 - Renaissance Drama 413
  • Further Reading 423
  • 30 - Restoration Theatre 424
  • Further Reading 435
  • 31 - The Origins of the Modern British Stage 436
  • Further Reading 449
  • 32 - Theories of Modern Drama 451
  • 33 - The Theatre of the Absurd 464
  • Further Reading 474
  • 34 - Theatre and Politics 475
  • Further Reading 487
  • 35 - Feminist Theatre 488
  • V - The Novel 503
  • 36 - Modes of Eighteenth-Century Fiction 505
  • Further Reading 516
  • 37 - Feminine Fictions 518
  • Further Reading 529
  • 38 - The Historical Novel 531
  • 39 - The Nineteenth-Century Social Novel in England 544
  • Further Reading 553
  • 40 - The Realist Novel: The European Context 554
  • Further Reading 564
  • 41 - Realism and the English Novel 565
  • Additional Works Cited 575
  • 42 - American Romance 576
  • Further Reading 586
  • 43 - Formalism and the Novel: Henry James 589
  • Further Reading 601
  • 44 - The Novel and Modern Criticism 602
  • Further Reading 617
  • 45 - The Modernist Novel in the Twentieth Century 619
  • 46 - British Fiction since 1930 631
  • 47 - Contemporary Fiction 643
  • Further Reading 649
  • VI - Criticism 651
  • 48 - Biblical Hermeneutics 653
  • Further Reading 664
  • 49 - Neo-Classical Criticism 666
  • Further Reading 680
  • Additional Works Cited 681
  • 50 - The Romantic Critical Tradition 682
  • 51 - Great Traditions: The Logic of the Canon 696
  • Further Reading 706
  • 52 - Marxist Criticism 708
  • Further Reading 719
  • 53 - The New Criticism 721
  • Further Reading 734
  • 54 - Structuralism and Post-Structuralism: from the Centre to the Margin 736
  • Further Reading 748
  • 55 - Feminist Literary Criticism: ‘New Colours and Shadows’ 750
  • Further Reading 762
  • 56 - Psychoanalytic Criticism 764
  • 57 - Deconstruction 777
  • Further Reading 789
  • 58 - New Historicism 791
  • Further Reading 803
  • VII - Production and Reception 807
  • 59 - Production and Reception of the Literary Book 809
  • 60 - The Printed Book 825
  • 61 - Literacy 837
  • 62 - Publishing before 1800 848
  • Further Reading 860
  • 63 - Publishing since 1800 862
  • Further Reading 874
  • 64 - British Periodicals and Reading Publics 876
  • Further Reading 887
  • 65 - Libraries and the Reading Public 889
  • 66 - Censorship 901
  • 67 - The Bibliographic Record 915
  • 68 - The Institutionalization of Literature: The University 926
  • Additional Works Cited 938
  • VIII - Contexts 939
  • 69 - Literature and the History of Ideas 941
  • 70 - Literature and the Bible 951
  • Further Reading 962
  • 71 - Literature and the Classics 964
  • Additional Works Cited 975
  • 72 - Folk Literature 976
  • Further Reading 988
  • 73 - Literature and the Visual Arts 991
  • 74 - Literature and Music 1004
  • Further Reading 1014
  • 75 - Literature and Landscape 1015
  • Further Reading 1027
  • 76 - The Sentimental Ethic 1029
  • 77 - The Gothic 1044
  • Further Reading 1054
  • 78 - Aestheticism 1055
  • 79 - Literature and Science 1068
  • 80 - Literature and Language 1082
  • 81 - Culture and Popular Culture: The Politics of Photopoetry 1098
  • IX - Perspectives 1111
  • 82 - New English Literatures 1113
  • 83 - African Literature in English 1125
  • Further Reading 1134
  • 84 - The African-American Literary Tradition 1136
  • 85 - Australian Literature and the British Tradition 1148
  • 86 - Canadian Literature 1162
  • Further Reading 1175
  • 87 - Indian Literature in English 1176
  • 88 - New Zealand and Pacific Literature 1186
  • Further Reading 1196
  • 89 - West Indian Literature 1198
  • Additional Works Cited 1209
  • 90 - Western Literature in Modern China 1210
  • X - Afterword 1219
  • W(H)Ither ‘English’? 1221
  • Further Reading 1236
  • The Contributors 1237
  • Index 1241
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