An Introduction to the Social History of Nursing

By Robert Dingwall; Anne Marie Rafferty et al. | Go to book overview

Glossary of abbreviations

AWA

Association of Workers in Asylums

BMA

British Medical Association

C(E) THV

Council for the (Education and) Training of Health Visitors

CMB

Central Midwives Board

COHSE

Confederation of Health Service Employees

COS

Charity Organisation Society

DHSS

Department of Health and Social Security

GNC

General Nursing Council

HMC

Hospital Management Committee

LCC

London County Council

LGB

Local Government Board

NALGO

National Association of Local Government Officers

NAWU

National Asylum Workers Union

NHS

National Health Service

NHSTA

National Health Service Training Authority

NSPCC

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

ODA

Operating Department Assistant

RCM

Royal College of Midwives

RCN

Royal College of Nursing

RCOG

Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

RHB

Royal Hospital Board

RMN

Registered Mental Nurse

(R)MPA

(Royal) Medico-Psychological Association

RSI

Royal Sanitary Institute

RSPCA

Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

SEN

State Enrolled Nurse

SRN

State Registered Nurse

TUC

Trades Union Congress

UKCC

United Kingdom Central Council for Nursing, Midwifery and Health Visiting

VAD

Voluntary Aid Detachment

WSIA

Women Sanitary Inspectors’ Association

-vii-

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An Introduction to the Social History of Nursing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Glossary of Abbreviations vii
  • Chapter One - Nurses and Servants 1
  • Chapter Two - The Revolution in Nursing 19
  • Chapter Three - The New Model Nurse 35
  • Chapter Four - Making the Myths 48
  • Chapter Five - The Search for Unity 77
  • Chapter Six - The Nationalization of Nursing 98
  • Chapter Seven - Mental Disorder and Mental Handicap 123
  • Chapter Eight - Midwifery 145
  • Chapter Nine - District Nursing and Health Visiting 173
  • Chapter Ten - Professional Autonomy and Economic Constraints 204
  • Notes 230
  • References 236
  • Index 251
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