ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

To Mrs Anne Ehrenpries I owe the suggestion that first led me to the manuscript of The Monk. Mr W. L. Hanchant of the Wisbech and Fenland Museum was unfailingly generous in making the manuscript available for my study in Wisbech and in allowing me to obtain a copy for use in preparing this edition. Aid from Indiana University and from Michigan State University helped to make my work possible. I am indebted to the Librarian of Harvard University, to Mr William Cagle of the Lilly library at Indiana University, and to Professor William Todd for providing copies of the early editions of the novel. Professor Ronald Gottesman gave me advice on every aspect of the preparation of my text, and Mrs Susan Gaylord, Miss Lorraine Hart, Mr Robert Ouellette, Mr Robert Reno, and Mr David Wright are all to be thanked for their help in carrying it out. Finally I want to acknowledge the initial encouragement of the late Professor Herbert Davis, to whose memory I dedicate the work I have done on this volume.

HOWARD ANDERSON

I should like to thank Julie Cooper, Robert Lee, and my father for many interesting conversations on The Monk⁁ which produced some useful ideas and suggestions. I am indebted to Karen Tiedtke, Robert Lee, my father, and Malcolm Upham for their help in researching the notes, to Robert, Julie, my mother, Dan, Ayesha, Rusty, and Ted for proof-reading, and to Richard Haslam for information on surrealism and The Monk. I should also particularly like to thank Karen Tiedtke for the translations from Lewis's German sources in the Explanatory Notes.

EMMA McEVOY

-vi-

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The Monk
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxxi
  • Select Bibliography xxxv
  • A Chronology of Matthew Gregory Lewis xxxvii
  • The Monk 1
  • Preface 3
  • Table of the Poetry 5
  • Advertisement 6
  • Volume I 7
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II *
  • Chapter III *
  • Volume II 129
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II 192
  • Chapter III 223
  • Chapter IV 256
  • Volume III 281
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II *
  • Chapter III *
  • Chapter IV 377
  • Chapter V *
  • Explanatory Notes 443
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