CHAPTER II

O You! whom Vanity's light bark conveys On Fame's mad voyage by the wind of praise, With what a shifting gale your course you ply, For ever sunk too low, or borne too high! Who pants for glory finds but short repose, A breath revives him, and a breath o'er-throws.

Pope.*

HERE THE MARQUIS concluded his adventures. Lorenzo, before He could determine on his reply, past some moments in reflection. At length He broke silence.

‘Raymond,’ said He taking his hand, ‘strict honour would oblige me to wash off in your blood the stain thrown upon my family; But the circumstances of your case forbid me to consider you as an Enemy. The temptation was too great to be resisted. ‘Tis the superstition of my Relations which has occasioned these misfortunes, and they are more the Offenders than yourself and Agnes. What has past between you cannot be recalled, but may yet be repaired by uniting you to my Sister. You have ever been, you still continue to be, my dearest and indeed my only Friend. I feel for Agnes the truest affection, and there is no one on whom I would bestow her more willingly than on yourself. Pursue then your design. I will accompany you tomorrow night, and conduct her myself to the House of the Cardinal. My presence will be a sanction for her conduct, and prevent her incurring blame by her flight from the Convent.’

The Marquis thanked him in terms by no means deficient in gratitude. Lorenzo then informed him, that He had nothing more to apprehend from Donna Rodolpha's enmity. Five Months had already elapsed,

-192-

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The Monk
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Oxford World's Classics *
  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Acknowledgements vi
  • Introduction vii
  • Note on the Text xxxi
  • Select Bibliography xxxv
  • A Chronology of Matthew Gregory Lewis xxxvii
  • The Monk 1
  • Preface 3
  • Table of the Poetry 5
  • Advertisement 6
  • Volume I 7
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II *
  • Chapter III *
  • Volume II 129
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II 192
  • Chapter III 223
  • Chapter IV 256
  • Volume III 281
  • Chapter I *
  • Chapter II *
  • Chapter III *
  • Chapter IV 377
  • Chapter V *
  • Explanatory Notes 443
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