Votes for Women: The Struggle for Suffrage Revisited

By Jean H. Baker | Go to book overview

in 1864 to insist on the vote for black men, even while lacking suffrage rights themselves. In their effort to stop Lincoln, the women saw evidence that they had indeed achieved a measure of national political influence when they were recognized by the president himself. Yet in the same episode, shut out of the abolitionist press, they were reminded of their dependence on resources they did not control. At the war's end, faced with Lincoln's reelection and Weed's ascendancy, the women could hardly consider themselves as political winners, but they were political players, with the insights, connections, and bruises to prove it.


NOTES
1
Eleanor Flexner, Century of Struggle: The Woman's Rights Movement in the United States, ed. Ellen Fitzpatrick, enlarged edition (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 1996), 136–37, 139, 141. “Hiatus” in Ellen DuBois, Feminism and Suffrage: The Emergence of an Independent Women's Movement in America, 1848–1869 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1978), 52. Wendy Hamand Venet, Neither Ballots Nor Bullets: Women Abolitionists and the Civil War (Charlottesville and London: University Press of Virginia, 1991) begins the work of revision with valuable chapters on the Women's Loyal National League and the election of 1864, although she views these episodes as steps toward politics rather than accomplished political practice (p. 148).
2
Janet L. Coryell, “Superseding Gender: The Role of the Woman Politico in Antebellum Partisan Politics,” in Political Identities: American Women and the Emergence of a Secular State, ed. Stephanie Cole and Alison Parker (Arlington: University of Texas Press, 2000).
3
Elizabeth R. Varon, “Tippecanoe and the Ladies Too: White Women and Party Politics in Antebellum Virginia,” Journal of American History 82 (Sept. 1995): 494–521; Rebecca Edwards, Angels in the Machinery: Gender and Party Politics from the Civil War to the Progressive Era (New York: Oxford University Press, 1997); Jean Gould Hales, “‘Co-Laborers in the Cause’: Women in the Ante-bellum Nativist Movement,” Civil War History 25 (June 1979): 119–38; Mary Hershberger, “Mobilizing Women, Anticipating Abolition: The Struggle against Indian Removal in the 1830s,” Journal of American History 86 (June 1999): 15–40; and the summary of scholarship in Ronald P. Formisano, “The ‘Party Period’ Revisited,” Journal of American History 86 (June 1999): 112–19.
4
Pamela Herr, J essie Benton Fremont: A Biography (New York: Franklin Watts, 1987), 262–63, and chaps. 17–18; Edwards, Angels in the Machinery,

-72-

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Votes for Women: The Struggle for Suffrage Revisited
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments *
  • Contents ix
  • Contributors xi
  • Votes for Women *
  • Introduction 3
  • Notes 20
  • 1 - The Case for Reform Antecedents for the Woman's Rights Movement 21
  • Notes 40
  • 2 - Sojourner Truth, Frances Watkins Harper, and the Struggle for Woman Suffrage 42
  • Notes *
  • 3 - The New York Woman's Movement and the Civil War 56
  • Notes 72
  • 4 - American Expansion and the Politics of Federalism, 1870–1890 77
  • Notes 87
  • 5 - Woman Suffrage in the West 90
  • Note 101
  • 6 - Southern Suffragists, the Nawsa, and the “Southern Strategy” in Context 102
  • Notes 114
  • 7 - The Anti-Suffrage Campaign 118
  • Notes 129
  • 8 - The Winning Plan 130
  • 9 - America and the Pankhursts 143
  • Notes 156
  • 10 - Harriot Stanton Blatch and Grassroots Politics 159
  • Note 173
  • 11 - Alice Paul and the Politics of Nonviolent Protest 174
  • Notes 186
  • Epilogue 189
  • Notes 194
  • Bibliography 197
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