Educating Deaf Students: From Research to Practice

By Marc Marschark; Harry G. Lang et al. | Go to book overview

FOUR
Education Begins at Home

What special efforts should parents make for their deaf babies and children?

How can we make sure that young deaf children will be ready for school?

Parents, siblings, and others provide young children with a context in which development occurs and supports and promotes early learning. In this chapter, we consider the roles of various individuals and early interventions in social, language, and cognitive development before children enter school. Because most deaf children are born to nonsigning, hearing parents, communication in the home is given special consideration, particularly with regard to the kinds of information and experience that contribute to those domains. We also consider the importance of implicit instruction in relation to fostering educational readiness and the potential effects on long-term academic achievement and personal growth. 1 Parents will encounter both opportunities and challenges in raising a deaf child, and research has demonstrated a variety of ways in which they can optimize their child's development. Therefore, we devote some space to describing the field on which early development takes place. Most important, we will see the importance of deaf children having early access to language, social interaction, and experiential diversity.


In the Beginning

Because most cases of deafness are not hereditary, many deaf children will have congenital or early-onset hearing losses that are totally unexpected (and usually unrecognized for some time) by their parents. Some of those children will be con-

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Educating Deaf Students: From Research to Practice
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface vii
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I - Educational Basics 1
  • One - Educating Deaf Students: an Introduction 3
  • Two - Lessons from History 15
  • Three - Characteristics of Deaf Learners 41
  • Four - Education Begins at Home 63
  • Part II - Educational Processes and Programs 87
  • Five - Language Development and Deaf Children 89
  • Six - Cognitive Development and Deaf Children 113
  • Seven - Educational Programs and Philosophies 135
  • Eight - Reading, Writing, and Literacy 157
  • Nine - Teaching and the Curriculum 187
  • Part III - Conclusion 217
  • Ten - Looking Ahead While Glancing Back 219
  • Notes 231
  • References 237
  • Author Index 263
  • Subject Index 267
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