Black Puritan, Black Republican: The Life and Thought of Lemuel Haynes, 1753-1833

By John Saillant | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

All work in early African American religion rests upon the efforts of the recoverers of the documents, many never published in their authors' lifetimes, of the eighteenth-century and early-nineteenth-century black Atlantic. These texts come to us through the deft hands of Arthur Schomberg, Dorothy Porter, Paul Edwards, Richard Newman, Ruth Bogin, Vincent Carretta, Graham Russell Hodges, Moira Ferguson, and others. I hope this book pays a small measure of the debt that so many owe them.

Happily, modern scholarly editions lead us to older works and unpublished manuscripts, which in turn urge us farther back in history. This book could hardly have been written without the resources of the following institutions: the American Antiquarian Society, the Boston Athenæum, the Boston Public Library, the Connecticut Historical Society, Harvard University, the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, the John Hay Library of Brown University, Western Michigan University, and the William L. Clements Library of the University of Michigan.

I studied Lemuel Haynes's writings and context while I was a postdoctoral fellow and occasional instructor at Brown University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the W. E. B. Du Bois Institute, Harvard University. I finished the manuscript as a new professor at Western Michigan University. Financial support came in the form of two fellowships from the American Council of Learned Societies and the National Endowment for the Humanities in the 1990s. The Boston Athenæum provided a stipend for a brief period but a desk, which I still consider the best in the world, for a year. Five experts in early American studies, above all others, offered various professional engagements: Douglas Arnold, Ronald Hoffman, Pauline Maier, the late William G. McLoughlin, and Gordon S. Wood. Patrick Manning deserves special mention as the director of a instructional-materials project on which I worked

-vii-

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Black Puritan, Black Republican: The Life and Thought of Lemuel Haynes, 1753-1833
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents *
  • Chronology of Lemuel Haynes's Life xi
  • Black Puritan, Black Republican *
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - A Further Liberty in 1776 9
  • 2 - Republicanism Black and White 47
  • 3 - The Divine Providence of Slavery and Freedom 83
  • 4 - Making and Breaking the Revolutionary Covenant 117
  • 5 - American Genesis, American Captivity 152
  • Notes 189
  • Index 229
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