Black Puritan, Black Republican: The Life and Thought of Lemuel Haynes, 1753-1833

By John Saillant | Go to book overview

Notes

Chapter 1
1
Timothy Mather Cooley, Sketches of the Life and Character of the Rev. Lemuel Haynes, A.M., For Many Years Pastor of a Church in Rutland, Vt., and Late in Granville, New-York (1837; reprint, New York: Negro Universities Press, 1969), pp. 28–29. Cooley's book is summarized in W. H. Morse, “Lemuel Haynes,” The Journal of Negro History 4 (1919): 22–32. For a contemporary's report on prejudice against Haynes, see Ebenezer Baldwin, Observations on the Physical, Intellectual, and Moral Qualities of Our Colored Population: With Remarks on the Subject of Emancipation and Colonization (New Haven, Conn.: L. H. Young, 1834), pp. 45– 46, discussed in Joanne Pope Melish, Disowning Slavery: Gradual Emancipation and “Race” in New England, 1780–1860 (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1998), p. 244.
2
William D. Piersen, Black Yankees: The Development of an Afro-American Subculture in Eighteenth-Century New England (Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1988), pp. 13–18, discusses the concentration of black New Englanders in cities and towns along waterways. Rita Roberts also notes the significant concentration of blacks near Haynes's birthplace; Roberts, “Patriotism and Political Criticism: The Evolution of Political Consciousness in the Mind of a Black Revolutionary Soldier,” Eighteenth-Century Studies 27 (1994): 569–88; see esp. p. 576. Benjamin Quarles, The Negro in the Making of America (New York: Collier Books, 1964), p. 41, takes a more general approach, noting that in 1755 blacks were about 10 percent of the Rhode Island population and at most 3 percent of that of other New England colonies.
3
Cooley, Haynes, pp. 27–29. Hayneses were among the first settlers of Hartford; some were leaders in Connecticut politics in the seventeenth century, others became Congregational ministers. The newborn Lemuel may have been sheltered by John Haynes (1724–1796), a descendant of the first governor of Connecticut, John Haynes, who was elected governor of Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1635 and of Connecticut in 1639. He served until his death in 1654 and was eulogized in Cotton Mather, Magnalia Christi Americana; Or, the Ecclesiastical History of New-England;

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Black Puritan, Black Republican: The Life and Thought of Lemuel Haynes, 1753-1833
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents *
  • Chronology of Lemuel Haynes's Life xi
  • Black Puritan, Black Republican *
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - A Further Liberty in 1776 9
  • 2 - Republicanism Black and White 47
  • 3 - The Divine Providence of Slavery and Freedom 83
  • 4 - Making and Breaking the Revolutionary Covenant 117
  • 5 - American Genesis, American Captivity 152
  • Notes 189
  • Index 229
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