Good Americans: Italian and Jewish Immigrants during the First World War

By Christopher M. Sterba | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

There are a great many people who helped me through the long process of writing this book. My first thanks are to my advisers, who read this study in its earliest forms and encouraged me to keep on going. I was blessed to have worked with three superb historians at Brandeis. For five years, Morton Keller provided exceptional commentary. Even more important, he helped reframe my thinking on issues of periodization in American history and encouraged me to work on a much larger playing field, with many more actors, than I had been prepared to do when I first arrived in Waltham a decade ago. Jacqueline Jones's solid support and critical readings were invaluable, and I've tried to follow her great example as a plain-speaking social historian. To Jane Kamensky I owe a huge debt. She made the publication of this book possible, and her excellent advice, sharp wit, and keen commentary on making the most of primary sources were a constant source of inspiration.

I was also very fortunate to have several careful readers. Christian Warren has been a terrific friend and colleague through it all, and I have benefited tremendously from swapping chapters and papers with him, unfortunately most of it long distance. Peter Carroll, Marjorie Feld, Lawrence Fuchs, Martha Gardner, Steve Lassonde, Ted Liazos, Wes Montgomery, Stephen Rice, Jonathan Sarna, and Stephan Thernstrom all provided helpful comments and criticism. I am deeply indebted to Martin Sklar for his many years of thoughtful and encouraging commentary on my work, as well as for his inspiring scholarship, which had a major influence on the shaping of this project. Susan Ferber at Oxford deserves special praise for her extremely thorough editorial guidance on the book. I would also like to thank the editors and reviewers of The New England Quarterly and the Journal of American Ethnic History, where portions of this manuscript have previously appeared as articles. Several other teachers and scholars have been important in helping me to shape the project, even if they did not advise me on the

-vii-

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Good Americans: Italian and Jewish Immigrants during the First World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents *
  • Good Americans *
  • Introduction - The Melting Pot Goes to War 3
  • 1 - The Heyday of the New Immigrant Enclave 9
  • I - Your Country Needs You 31
  • 2 - Raising Volunteers and the Italian Response in New Haven 34
  • 3 - The Draft and New York Jewry 53
  • II - Training the New Immigrant Soldier 83
  • 4 - Being Italian in the Yankee Division 86
  • 5 - Being Jewish in the National Army 105
  • III - The Home Front 131
  • 6 - More Than Ever, We Feel Proud to Be Italians 133
  • 7 - New York Jewry Must Do Its Duty 153
  • 8 - Survival and Victory on the Western Front 175
  • Epilogue - A New Voice in Politics 202
  • Notes 213
  • Selected Bibliography 251
  • Index 265
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