Good Americans: Italian and Jewish Immigrants during the First World War

By Christopher M. Sterba | Go to book overview

Notes

Introduction
1
Private Abraham Krotoshinsky, American Jewish Committee War Records Questionnaire, American Jewish Historical Society (hereafter AJC War Records, AJHS); “Krotoshinsky's Own Story,” in Jewish Welfare Board Sentinel, Aug. 1919; Thomas M. Johnson and Fletcher Pratt, The Lost Battalion (Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill), 223, 250– 251, 255; and Jewish Forum, Oct. 1941.
2
Surprisingly, this subject has attracted very little attention from historians. There are no full-length studies of Italian immigrants during the war. And despite a good deal of research on the Italian community of New Haven, the years 1917–1919 have been virtually ignored. Only two older works have dealt with wartime Jewry, and the numerous social histories written on New York's Jews have given the war only minimal, if any attention.

For the war and Italian immigrants, see Gary Mormino, “Over Here: St. Louis Italo–Americans and the First World War,” Missouri Historical Society Bulletin 30 (October 1973), 44–53; and Humbert Nelli, “Chicago's Italian Language Press and World War I,” in Francesco Cordasco, ed., Studies in Italian American Social History (Totowa, N.J.: Rowman and Littlefield, 1975). The numerous community studies that appeared on Italian Americans in the 1970s and 1980s pay almost no attention to the impact of the war. See Humbert Nelli, Italians in Chicago, 1880–1930: A Study in Ethnic Mobility (New York: Oxford University Press, 1970); Virginia Yans-McLaughlin, Family and Community: Italian Immigrants in Buffalo, 1880–1920 (Ithaca, N.Y.: Cornell University Press, 1978); Donna Gabaccia, From Sicily to Elizabeth Street: Housing and Social Change Among Italian Immigrants, 1880–1930 (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1984); Judith E. Smith, Family Connections: A History of Italian and Jewish Immigrant Lives in Providence, Rhode Island, 1900–1940 (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1985); and Gary Mormino, Immigrants on the Hill: Italian Americans in St. Louis, 1882–1982 (Urbana: Illinois University Press, 1986).

Studies of New Haven's Italian population include Phyllis Williams, South Italian Folkways in Europe and America (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1938); Irvin Child, Italian or American? The Second Generation in Conflict (New Haven, Conn.: Yale University Press, 1943); Jerome K. Myers, “Time Differential Factor in Assimilation: A

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Good Americans: Italian and Jewish Immigrants during the First World War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents *
  • Good Americans *
  • Introduction - The Melting Pot Goes to War 3
  • 1 - The Heyday of the New Immigrant Enclave 9
  • I - Your Country Needs You 31
  • 2 - Raising Volunteers and the Italian Response in New Haven 34
  • 3 - The Draft and New York Jewry 53
  • II - Training the New Immigrant Soldier 83
  • 4 - Being Italian in the Yankee Division 86
  • 5 - Being Jewish in the National Army 105
  • III - The Home Front 131
  • 6 - More Than Ever, We Feel Proud to Be Italians 133
  • 7 - New York Jewry Must Do Its Duty 153
  • 8 - Survival and Victory on the Western Front 175
  • Epilogue - A New Voice in Politics 202
  • Notes 213
  • Selected Bibliography 251
  • Index 265
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