Handbook of Psychological Services for Children and Adolescents

By Jan N. Hughes; Annette M. La Greca et al. | Go to book overview

4
Established and Emerging Models
of Psychological Services
in School Settings
CYNTHIA A. RICCIO
JAN N. HUGHES

This chapter provides an orientation to delivering psychological services in school settings for those psychologists who are not familiar with this context of service delivery. School-based models for psychological services can facilitate both student access to services and the interaction between the context in which problems may occur and the intervention/treatment program (Davis, 1999). A number of advantages to school-based services have been identified, including the opportunities for collaboration or consultation with school staff, opportunities for primary and secondary prevention interventions, elimination of barriers of transportation, and the decreased stigma that may be associated with accessing psychological services in schools as compared with outpatient settings (Armbruster, Gerstein, & Fallon, 1999). In particular, it has been suggested that children from minority cultures will be more likely to utilize services within the school setting (Comer, 1985). Finally, the practice and science of psychology address the need for the integration of educational and health services, as well as for more comprehensive service delivery to children and families (Talley, 1995; Talley & Short, 1996).

In describing the delivery of psychological services in schools, there are a number of issues to be considered. These include various existing models for the organization and administration of school psychological services, ethical considerations that come into play when functioning within the school system, and legal issues, as well as the differing taxonomies that are used in schools as opposed to the private sector. In addition, credentialing issues and other differences that may come to bear on the ability to provide services within the school setting, the myriad models for the provision of psychological services, and avenues for employment by a school

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