Handbook of Psychological Services for Children and Adolescents

By Jan N. Hughes; Annette M. La Greca et al. | Go to book overview

13
Children and Adolescents Experiencing
Traumatic Brain Injury
STEPHEN R. HOOPER
CHRISTOPHER BAGLIO

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death or permanent disability in children and adolescents (Guyer & Ellers, 1990). The sheer magnitude of this problem is complicated by the fact that most TBIs are mild in severity and that many likely go unreported or undetected. In the spirit of this text, what kinds of empirically validated treatments and services are available for work with children and adolescents who have sustained a TBI? Do these interventions work in specific situations and with particular clients having a particular profile of abilities? How long should the interventions be implemented? What about issues of maintenance and generalization of functioning? Can functions really return following a TBI? How does the communication between the various systems in the child's life contribute to facilitating or hindering treatment efforts? How can intervention strategies be utilized in the day-to-day practice of clinicians in communities across the country?

Although this chapter does not attempt to address all of these questions, a number of issues are discussed in relationship to the treatment of children and adolescents who have sustained a TBI. Following an overview of TBI, which includes a discussion of definitional issues, prevalence, precursors and risk factors, major causes, and general outcomes, several key intervention strategies that have been implemented for children and adolescents with TBI are presented. A third section describes the issues of integrating these interventions into real-world settings. In this fashion, several ongoing programs are described, along with selected problems and pitfalls.

-267-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Psychological Services for Children and Adolescents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 485

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.