Handbook of Psychological Services for Children and Adolescents

By Jan N. Hughes; Annette M. La Greca et al. | Go to book overview

14
Treating Antisocial and
Delinquent Youth in
Out-of-Home Settings
PETER G. SPRENGELMEYER
PATRICIA CHAMBERLAIN

Estimates of the prevalence of delinquent and antisocial behavior in adolescent populations are difficult to derive because youths with these behaviors may present in either the mental health or juvenile justice systems. In the mental health system, a conservative population estimate of the prevalence of conduct disorder (6%; Institute of Medicine, 1989; Offord et al., 1987) would suggest that at any given time there are approximately 4 million youth in the United States who exhibit serious antisocial behavior (Kazdin, 1994). In 1995, the juvenile courts processed 1,714,300 youths (Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention [OJJDP], 1998), and this figure does not include the numerous youths already in the juvenile justice system prior to 1995. Of course, there is no clear way to know how many of these adolescents were reported to both the mental health and juvenile justice systems, and there is likely overlap between these estimates.

Increasing numbers of these youths have been deemed by the juvenile courts or the mental health system as being unable to be returned to their families. The American Public Welfare Association estimated that in 1990 there were 65,000 children and adolescents in residential care (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 1995), and the United States Department of Justice reported that 159,900 youths were ordered to out-of-home placements by juvenile courts in 1995 (OJJDP, 1998). Although point-prevalence figures for antisocial and delinquent behavior are difficult to determine, estimates can be made for youth in residential care who meet particular criteria. For example, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (1999) conducted a census on October 29, 1997, of courtadjudicated youth under 21 years of age who were assigned to a residential bed

-285-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Handbook of Psychological Services for Children and Adolescents
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 485

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.