Facing America: Iconography and the Civil War

By Shirley Samuels | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Over the past few turbulent years, in locations from Santa Cruz to Delaware, from Wisconsin to Ithaca, from Puerto Vallarta to San Antonio, from Cancun to Berlin, I have benefited from the encouragement of many friends and colleagues. Knowing that these lists are inadequate, I want to thank: Dale Bauer, Gretchen Bauer, Laura Brown, Martin Brueckner, Annie Burns, Cynthia Chase, Eric Cheyfitz, Walter Cohen, Ray Craib, Joe Donahue, Lisa Dundon, Zoe Forrester, Ellen Gainor, Keith George, Susan Gillman, Jackie Goldsby, Leslie Goldstein, Kirsten Silva Gruesz, Salah Hassan, Gordon Hutner, Virginia Jackson, Anatole Krattiger, Mary Loeffelholz, Michelle Massie, Harryette Mullen, Jean Pfaelzer, Mary Roldan, Rebecca Schneider, Eric Sundquist, Candace Waid, Priscilla Wald, and Elizabeth Young. The personal and political especially joined for me in the many conversations with Mary, Lisa, Kirsten, Leslie, Laura, and Jackie. My graduate students at Cornell University and the University of Delaware gave these ideas voice and momentum through stimulating exchanges. Late in the project, I had inspiring conversations with, among others, Alicia Anderson, Hilary Emmett, and Shirleen Robinson. A particular thanks to Darlene Flint and Heather Gowe for crisis management in the office.

I also want to thank my extended family again. More and more I am grateful for their roles in my life: Larry, Nils, Rolf, Lisa, Joel, Maya, Christy, Ali, Amy, Sarah, Margaret Ann, Marilyn, Larry, Lucia, and my grandmother Helen.

Very special thanks are offered to those who have helped with my children: Alicia Anderson, Mattias Bjork, Kusum Dave, Monica Espinoza,

-vii-

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Facing America: Iconography and the Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • Illustrations xi
  • Facing America *
  • Introduction 3
  • 1 - Facing West 16
  • 2 - Miscegenated America 41
  • 3 - The Face of the Nation 58
  • 4 - Women at War 81
  • 5 - Lincoln's Body 99
  • Epilogue 118
  • Notes 131
  • Bibliography 159
  • Index 179
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