Who Is Ruling in South Sudan? The Role of NGOs in Rebuilding Socio-Political Order

By Volker Riehl | Go to book overview

Summary

The often emphasised paradigm of ‘African state failure’ in creating the legitimate, fertile ground for INGO-domination does not exist in South Sudan. INGOs have the unique opportunity to help create their understanding of civil organisation by providing training and capacity-building facilities to future administrators. The SPLA has won the war against the GOS, but lost against the ‘armies of INGOs’ which occupied their territory in the name of humanitarianism. The Ground-Rules of 1995 developed into an INGOconstitution while the MOU of 2000 can be interpreted as a hasty and hot-tempered legislation attempt by the SPLM/A-SRRA in order not to lose face in the battle for the political leitmotiv.

The artificial maintenance of a relief atmosphere and emergency environment allowed INGOs to continue their informal assistance without allowing direct interference from local authorities. Informal assistance meant support for SINGOs. Two socio-economic conditions led this path dependency. Firstly, the absence of a formal peace-treaty (‘permanent emergencies’) and the ‘pathological’ weakness and inefficiency of officially introduced relief institutions (such as SRRA). This ‘in vitro creation’ of replacements for local organ's responsibility was accompanied by the paradoxical phenomenon that the population, living ‘officially’ in a war and emergency situation created a multitude of local organisations with the assistance and unofficial leadership of SINGOs which is actually a social result of a peaceful political environment.

The MOU was not only ‘too little too late’ but also wrongly directed and based on a misleading needs assessment. Instead of being the basis for regionally adapted and comprehensive developmental strategies (with the civil arm of the rebels being the steering agent), it showed only regulatory competence which suited the command structure of an institution with a military background. The MOU was a counterweight for the prevailing unregulated activities playing and testing the field of South Sudan, which proved to be ineffective in that it did not have any considerable impact on the work of INGOs.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Who Is Ruling in South Sudan? The Role of NGOs in Rebuilding Socio-Political Order
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents 3
  • Abbreviations and Acronyms *
  • Acknowledgement 4
  • Introduction *
  • Analysis *
  • Discussion 15
  • Summary 17
  • Bibliography and Sources 18
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 20

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.