Unsettled States, Disputed Lands: Britain and Ireland, France and Algeria, Israel and the West Bank-Gaza

By Ian S. Lustick | Go to book overview

CHAPTER ELEVEN
A Theory of States and Territories: Extensions and Implications

The overall concern of this book has been to apply a theory of punctuated institutional transformation to the problem of change in the territorial composition of three states. Now it is time to show that the theory is generalizable, that it poses questions, suggests explanations, and "predicts facts" in a much wider variety of settings than the three cases I have examined. Its generalizability extends along two main axes: applications to more instances of state expansion and contraction; and applications to other processes of institutionalization.

In the late 1960s, Andrei Amalrik asked if the Soviet Union would last until 1984. 1 That year came and went, and Amalrik's question seemed no more relevant than it had when his book was published. The Soviet state's command over its vast territories seemed unshakeable. And then suddenly the Soviet state was gone. When the authors of the August 1991 coup tried to preserve the state in its old configuration and with its old regime, their attempt collapsed as quickly as some thought the movement toward democracy would once the old guard took out its heavy guns. In place of the Soviet Union, an array of successor states emerged within borders whose institutionalization was among their most vital and difficult tasks. What can account for the suddenness and scope of these transitions?

The Soviet state inherited most of its borders from the tsarist regime. Tsarist policies of military expansion and imperial rule created so vast and heterogeneous a domain that any subsequent regime would be hard pressed to mystify claims to authority on a purely national or ethnic basis. This was not a problem for the Bolsheviks, whose ultimate objective was to legitimize claims to authority primarily on the basis of class or party

-439-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unsettled States, Disputed Lands: Britain and Ireland, France and Algeria, Israel and the West Bank-Gaza
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 576

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.