The Dream of the Moving Statue

By Kenneth Gross | Go to book overview

3
Eating the Statue

The abstraction of a work of sculpture from the muddled field of bodily and historical life is obviously partial, dialectical. The abstraction remains, as it were, part of that life; it is something the sculptor can both struggle against and use. Nevertheless, the fact that a statue can be said to draw back from time, to stand or defend against time—this is part of what makes statues such ideal homes for those ideals, virtues, aspirations, and accomplishments that we might wish to transcend time, survive history and physical contingency. That very distance is part of what makes them appeal to us as resonant images of a serious idea, as things with the look of something meaningful, worthy of a pedestal, but also comfortingly general and nonreferential. 1 Thing and image at once, the statue's very lack of obvious meaning may be what attracts us to it. As William Gass notes, the monument or statue may mark the site of an ongoing cultural struggle between memory and denial; its construction may make possible both a pretense of memory and a de facto oblivion. 2 The statue is often the substance of what we do not remember (no doubt why monuments beget so many diminished replicas of themselves in the form of forgettable "souvenirs"). The statue's saving feature is perhaps that it shows the inevitable bondage of our abstractions to some fantasy of the body's life and may thus help us reknow or relocate that life, though it may also do violence to both the life of the body and the different life of those forms we may need or wish to conceive of as without a body, as hovering within or outside the body.

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Dream of the Moving Statue
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Dream of the Moving Statue *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Preface *
  • Part One *
  • 1 - Signs of Life: an Introduction *
  • 2 - The Death of Sculpture *
  • 3 - Eating the Statue *
  • Part Two *
  • 4 - Idolomachia *
  • 5 - You May Touch This Statue *
  • 6 - Resisting Pygmalion *
  • Part Three *
  • 7 - Crossings *
  • 8 - The Space between *
  • Part Four 136
  • 9 - Talking with Statues *
  • 10 - The Thing Itself (Which Does Not Move) *
  • Coda: Ordinary Statues 199
  • Notes *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 251

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.