The Management of International Enterprises: A Socio-Political View

By Monir H. Tayeb | Go to book overview

8
Human Resource Management

INTRODUCTION

Human resource management (HRM) has been defined in many ways and various models have been developed and discussed to tease out its specific character (see for example Legge (1995) for a thorough review and analysis of the literature). HRM is clearly rooted in its ancestor, personnel management, with a strategic slant (Legge 1989; Poole, 1990; Storey, 1992; Schuler et al., 1993). So, in fact, one still deals with issues such as selection, recruitment, training, remuneration and the like, the preserve of personnel management. But all these issues are considered bearing the overall strategies of the firm in mind and the ways in which HRM can contribute to those strategies.

In addition, HRM has been viewed from two different but not necessarily incompatible perspectives (Legge, 1995): hard and soft (Storey, 1987; Hendry and Pettigrew, 1990). According to the hard model, reflecting utilitarian instrumentalism, HRM is used to drive the strategic objectives of the firm (Fomburn et al., 1984) and that human resource, the object of formal manpower planning, is a ‘resource’, like other factors of production, and an expense of doing business rather than the only resource capable of turning inanimate factors of production into wealth (Tyson and Fell, 1986).

Some might argue that this is a degrading view of humans and in any case ignores fundamental differences between people and other resources. Production factors other than humans are comparatively less anchored and therefore can be moved around, shuffled, reduced, increased, transformed and discarded relatively freely to suit managers’ requirements. Their value is subject to market forces in most cases in a straightforward manner. But humans are different. They have needs, emotions, interests and attachments, and they perform their tasks best if these are reasonably catered for. They cannot be easily discarded and shuffled around against their wishes without causing individual and/or social upset. A woman manager with young children and a working husband and located in London, is far less mobile compared to a sum of £200 000 which can be electronically transferred from the City of London to Hong Kong within seconds (Tayeb, 1996a).

-127-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Management of International Enterprises: A Socio-Political View
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 184

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.