Topographies of Hellenism: Mapping the Homeland

By Artemis Leontis | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6 Cosmos: Modernist Poetics in a National Universe

Probably the great revolution of difference . . . is precisely people's last attempt to grapple, to attach themselves to their earth, before they abandon it, before it abandons them like leftover trash. Small is beautiful. And there's a good chance these three words, the contests of nations, will slowly erode the empire of Europe that is trying to take shape.

-- Mimíka Kranáki, Φιλέλληνες (Philhellenes)

Defining a regional identity was a response to Modernism.

-- Steven S. High, "The Significance of Place"

Some forty years before Europeans--Eastern and Western--were to find themselves again in "the contests of nations," grappling in the 1990s to dig in their roots, "to attach themselves to their earth," Odysseus Elytis's poetry precociously anticipated the passion of reasserting one's regional, ethnic identity. Initially a protoporiakós 'avant- garde' surrealist more interested in literary developments in Paris than in Greece,1 Elytis emerged as a national poet after World War II. In what was becoming an ever more Europeanized Greek world, he campaigned for indigenous art and condemned Greece's subservience to Western Hellenism. Contradictory as this may seem, it was as a national poet that he consolidated his reputation worldwide.2

____________________
1
Elytis's circle included the poets who introduced surrealism to Greece: Andréas Embiríkos ( 1901-75), Níkos Engonópulos (b. 1910), Yórgos Sarandáris ( 1908-41), and Nános Valaorítis (b. 1921). In France, Elytis knew André Breton ( 1896-1966), Tristan Tzara ( 1896-1963), Giuseppe Ungaretti (b. 1888), Pablo Picasso ( 1881-1973), Alberto Giacometti ( 1901-66), Henri Matisse ( 1869-1954), and others.
2
Elytis first published poems in the journal Ta néa grámmata in 1935. Prosanatolismí (Orientations), his first collection of poetry, appeared in 1940. Two other collections

-172-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Topographies of Hellenism: Mapping the Homeland
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.