Puppets and "Popular" Culture

By Scott Cutler Shershow | Go to book overview

Index
acrobatics, II, 121. See also carnivalesque
acting, 15-16. See also actor(s)
actor(s): moral conduct of, 124-25; pretending to be puppets, 149-50, 187-88; as puppeteers in hard times. 53n, 110, 144, 153, 154; as "puppets," 115-23, 138, 187-88, 195, 196, 211-12; versus puppets, 48, 50. 148-49, 186, 192-94, 196-201, 205, 209, 210-II, 214, 217-20; as socially marginal, 55, 153, See also acting; actor-managers; authorial control; prompters
"The Actor and the Über-Marionette" ( Craig), 195-201 actor-managers, 116, 119-20, 145, 147-48, 153, 169n
The Actors Remonstrance and Complaint for the Silencing of Their Profession (anonymous), 124-28
Addison, Joseph, 121, 135, 136-38, 175n
Adorno, Theodor, 222, 225
Adrian, Arthur A., 180n
The Adventures of Pinocchio: Story of a Puppet ( Collodi), 225-32, 229
aesthetic hierarchies, 10, 135-44, 183-210
"Against Garnesche" (Skelton), 32
age.See children
"agitator," 128-30
An Agitator Anotomiz'd, or the Character of an Agitator (Presbyterian pamphlet), 128-30
Agnew, Jean Christophe, 55n, 67
The Alchemist ( Jonson), 30, 89-90
Alexander, 139, 140
Allen, Holly, 233-34
Althusser, Louis, z30
The Anatomic of Abuses (Stubbes), 72
Ancrene Riwle, 29
Anderson, Benedict, 177
Anne ( queen of England), 117, 118
Antonio and Mellida ( Marston) 64n, 93
Antony and Cleopatra ( Shakespeare). 97
apes. See monkeys
Apollo, 121
Apperson, G. L., 76n, 78n
appropriation: and consumption, 4, 225-41; definition of, 4. 6, 218; Disney's. 233-34; of elite culture by puppet theater, 47, 114, 156, 189, 238; intermingling as essential element of, 7-8, 139-40, 143-44, 155n, 156, 160-61, 165-67, 170, 207-8, 238, 241; of non-Western cultural practices, 187, 193, 194-95, 203, 220-22; of Punch, II, 161-82; of witchcraft prosecutions, 36-37, See also appropriation (of puppet theater); elite culture; popular culture
appropriation (of puppet theater), 2-12, 47, 180-82; by avant-garde, 183-210; to establish aesthetic elite, 135-53; by Fielding, 144-54, 157-58; by Jonson, 90-91, 99-107, 152-53; by Plato, 22; in plays and pamphlets before 1642, 68n; by political conservatives, 123-35; by Protestant Reformers, 41-42; by Shakespeare. 91-99
Aquinas, Thomas, 70n
Arendt, Hannah, 19n, 65n
Areopagitica ( Milton), 112
Aristode, 29-30, 62, 70
Aronowirz, Stanley, 6n
The Arraignment of Lewd, idle, forward, and unconstant women ( Swetnam), 73
Artaud, Antonin, 9n
"The Artists of the Theatre of the Future" ( Craig), 200-201
The Art of Management ( Charke), 154, 156
Ashton, John, 113n
Asian puppets, 2, 220-22
As You Like It ( Shakespeare), 83
Athenaeus, 17
audience: absence of, in avant-garde performances,

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