Underground Harmonies: Music and Politics in the Subways of New York

By Susie J. Tanenbaum | Go to book overview

Notes

Preface
1.
Edward T. Hall, The Hidden Dimension ( New York: Doubleday, 1966), p. 52.

Introduction -- Venturing Down
1.
Deborah Sontag, "Unlicensed Peddlers, Unfettered Dreams", New York Times, June 14, 1993, Al.
2.
The names given to these stations indicate major commercial institutions or dis- tricts in their vicinity. In reality, only Grand Central and Times Square are so designated by the Transit Authority. The Port Authority station is adjacent to the bus terminal known by this name but is operated by the TA, not by the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey.
3.
Patricia J. Campbell, Passing the Hat: Street Performers in America ( New York: Delacorte Press, 1981), p. 101.
4.
For the term "circle," see Sally Harrison-Pepper, Drawing a Circle in the Square: Street Performing in New York's Washington Square Park ( Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 1990). I use it broadly to describe various audience configurations.
5.
Lawrence W. Levine, Highbrow Lowbrow: The Emergence of Cultural Hierarchy in America ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988), p. 9.
6.
I use the term "authorities" to refer to the quasi-governmental MTA and TA, not to law enforcement agents, as is often the practice. Jim Dwyer, in Subway Lives: 24 Hours in the Life of the New York City Subway ( New York: Crown, 1991), pp. 221- 22, maintains that the MTA is "a symbol of independent authorities that are beyond the control of elected officials." Nevertheless, he adds, the chief executives of authorities are aware that one of their primary responsibilities is to shield the elected officials who appointed them from public criticism.

1 Setting Up
1.
Harrison-Pepper, Drawing a Circle, p. xiv.
2.
Simon Frith, Sound Effects: Youth, Leisure, and the Politics of Rock 'n' Roll ( New York. Pantheon, 1981), p. 29.

-241-

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Underground Harmonies: Music and Politics in the Subways of New York
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction - Venturing Down 1
  • Part 1 - Making Music Underground 9
  • 1 - Setting Up 11
  • 2 - The Beat Goes On: History 27
  • 3 - The Partners: Subway Musicians and Their Audiences 48
  • 4 - Boundaries and Bridges: Relationships in Public Space 97
  • Part II - Seeking Harmony Kunderground 123
  • 5 - Music under New York: Official Sponsorship 125
  • 6 - Sounds and Silence: Regulating Subway Music 148
  • 7 - Walking the Beat: Transit Police 170
  • 8 - Music on the Job: Subway Workers 185
  • 9 - Prospects for Change 209
  • Appendix 1 - Subway Homelessness 227
  • Appendix 2 - New York Street Music 234
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliography 255
  • Index 263
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