The German Predicament: Memory and Power in the New Europe

By Andrei S. Markovits; Simon Reich | Go to book overview

Conclusion: The Predicament of the Berlin Republic

The Germans will never forgive us for Auschwitz -- Zvi Rex, Israeli psychoanalyst

Politics in the Berlin Republic will barely vary from politics in its Bonn predecessor. The new Germany is geographically larger, by the magnitude of the state of Indiana, and more populous by 17 million people. However, in its qualitative features and characteristics this new entity will not differ much from the immensely successful republic headquartered in a sleepy university town on the Rhine. This is in essence how optimists, in Germany and abroad, see the future of German politics and society. As we have argued, there is plenty of strong evidence for such a view, and indeed we share much of this optimism. Focusing on the durability of the Bonn Republic's democratic institutions and political culture, we count ourselves among the most optimistic interpreters of the Berlin Republic's future.

The democratic structures of Modell Deutschland are so well entrenched, domestically and multilaterally, that the benefits of loyalty far exceed any that a possible exit or new voice might yield. In its latest incarnation (how many more will there be in decades and centuries to come?), Germany will remain democratically exemplary.

Still, the Berlin Republic will be significantly different from its Bonn predecessor. Changes in quantity and geography, accompanied by epochal rearrangements of global affairs in the wake of the eruptions of 1989 and 1990, entail a major shift in the very character and identity of Germany. This shift, the pessimists fear, may not bode well either for the future of Germany's democracy or for the political stability and autonomy of Germany's European neighbors.

Although we found virtually no evidence to support concerns about the continued flourishing of German democracy, we do wonder whether optimism may be misplaced in the context of German power. It is here, we argue, that Germany's self-understanding remains murky. Germany vacillates between an overbearing projection of power (mainly, though not exclusively, in the realm of the economy) and a reticence about admitting that power; the country's identity remains uncertain and ill-defined in the area of power as it is crystal clear in the domain of democracy. The analogy to the United States in the interwar period, able to lead but unwilling to do so, still holds.

-203-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The German Predicament: Memory and Power in the New Europe
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 248

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.