Upper Canada: The Formative Years, 1784-1841

By Gerald M. Craig | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
A Frontier Province 1796-1812

The men who headed the government in the following years had little of Simcoe's vigour and imagination. The first incumbent, Peter Russell, the Receiver General, became Administrator1 when Simcoe left. He was a cautious and timid man, worried of offending his superiors, and easily depressed by minor irritations. Aware that he might be superseded at any moment, he attempted no new departures, but simply carried on Simcoe's plans, as nearly as he understood them. Some improvements in land-granting procedure were effected, and in general a reasonably capable but rather plodding government succeeded the somewhat whirlwind Simcoe era. Lacking the respect of his associates on the executive council and the authority of a lieutenant-governor, this elderly functionary had little opportunity and less desire to make a positive imprint upon the province over which he presided so uneasily and so fretfully. Fortunately for him there was an easier atmosphere along the border in a period when Anglo-American relations were improving, following Jay's Treaty, and when there was increasing hostility between France and the United States.

General Peter Hunter, who assumed the reins of government in August 1799, also made little impression upon Upper Canada during the six years until his sudden death in 1805. He was a professional soldier, and something of a martinet, who seems to have regarded the province as one more regiment to be commanded. Since he had also been appointed to the post of commander of the armed forces in British North America, he was a part-time lieutenant-governor who had to spend a large part of his time at Quebec. During his prolonged absences he left a committee of the executive council in charge of the day-to-day running of the government, armed with batches of signed proclamations and other documents on which the committee was to fill in the blanks when they were issued. At the outset Hunter declared that the government was to be carried on exactly as here-

-42-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Upper Canada: The Formative Years, 1784-1841
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 320

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.